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Two-day music festival held at Dhaka University

Cultural Reporter

 
A chorus presentation, led by Leena Tapashi Khan, at the musical programme on Sunday.
Two-day music festival organised by Dhaka University’s music department ended on Sunday with presentation of Pancha Kabi’s gaan, songs composed by five great poets of Bengal.
Teachers and students at the programme rendered evergreen songs composed by Rabindranath Tagore, Kazi Nazrul Islam, Dwijendralal Roy, Rajanikanta Sen and Atulprasad Sen at the programme at TSC, Dhaka University.
Celebrated artistes like Dil Afroz Reba and Bhajan Baul and talented dancer Warda Rihab, and others performed at the programme as guest artistes.
The programme began with a chorus rendition of Atulprasad’s song Ghomtakhani khol o bodhu by the students. They subsequently rendered Rajanikanta’s song Teer samirey chanchal nirey and Dwijendralal’s song Banga amar janani amar.  Celebrated singer and a teacher of the department, Azizur Rahman Tuhin, led the chorus.
Noted Nazrul singer Leena Taposhi Khan, a professor of the department, led the students to sing Nazrul’s song Nabin asha jaglo je re aaj, which glorifies the vivacious beauty of youth.
The concluding day’s event appeared even more colourful one at the presentation of three segments from Tagore’s dance drama Bhanusingher Padaboli by Warda Rihab and her troupe.
The audience also enjoyed the soulful presentation of traditional songs by the students. The segment began with a chorus presentation of a bhatiali song Padmar dheu re.
Their presentation of the mystic Lalon song Guru dohai tomar monke amar just moved the audience.
Another Lalon song Ke banailo ronger mahal khana was presented by Amanullah, a student.
Another student Jasimuddin rendered a popular baul Shah Abdul Karim’s song Premer manush ghumaiya thakle.   
Guest artiste Bhajan Baul moved the crowd by presenting a couple of more songs by Lalon Shah and Shah Abdul Karim. Dil Afroz Reba sang a bhaoaia song Bania bondhu re and another Shah Abdul Karim’s popular number Amar-e keu chhoiyo na.
The festival was dedicated to the memory of recently deceased singer and researcher, Mridulkanti Chakrobarty, who was also a professor of the department.
Earlier, the  two-day  was  inaugurated  on Sunday by  Cultural Affairs Minister Abul Kalam Azad as  chief guest while  DU vice chancellor AAMS Arefin Siddique present as the special guest.
On the  first  day, students and teachers of the department rendered classical music and Bangla classics of 1960s and ‘70s on the opening day programme.
The musical programme began with a soothing voice modulation by popular classical music singer Prianka Gope, also a teacher of the department. She improvised on raga Bhairavi, one of the most beautiful ragas.
Subsequently her students joined the chorus that moved the houseful audience with a perfect beginning.
Led by another teacher of the department Mohammad Shoyeb, the students presented raga Darbari and again they successfully captivated the hearts of the audiences.
However, the main attraction of the evening was the presentation of the songs of yesteryears. In choral rendition, the students gave a spirited start of the segment with the popular song O re neel doria. Subsequently they presented two more hit numbers – Ei je akash and Pal de re noukai—in chorus.

Comment

Cultural Reporter

 
A chorus presentation, led by Leena Tapashi Khan, at the musical programme on Sunday.
Two-day music festival organised by Dhaka University’s music department ended on Sunday with presentation of Pancha Kabi’s gaan, songs composed by five great poets of Bengal.
Teachers and students at the programme rendered evergreen songs composed by Rabindranath Tagore, Kazi Nazrul Islam, Dwijendralal Roy, Rajanikanta Sen and Atulprasad Sen at the programme at TSC, Dhaka University.
Celebrated artistes like Dil Afroz Reba and Bhajan Baul and talented dancer Warda Rihab, and others performed at the programme as guest artistes.
The programme began with a chorus rendition of Atulprasad’s song Ghomtakhani khol o bodhu by the students. They subsequently rendered Rajanikanta’s song Teer samirey chanchal nirey and Dwijendralal’s song Banga amar janani amar.  Celebrated singer and a teacher of the department, Azizur Rahman Tuhin, led the chorus.
Noted Nazrul singer Leena Taposhi Khan, a professor of the department, led the students to sing Nazrul’s song Nabin asha jaglo je re aaj, which glorifies the vivacious beauty of youth.
The concluding day’s event appeared even more colourful one at the presentation of three segments from Tagore’s dance drama Bhanusingher Padaboli by Warda Rihab and her troupe.
The audience also enjoyed the soulful presentation of traditional songs by the students. The segment began with a chorus presentation of a bhatiali song Padmar dheu re.
Their presentation of the mystic Lalon song Guru dohai tomar monke amar just moved the audience.
Another Lalon song Ke banailo ronger mahal khana was presented by Amanullah, a student.
Another student Jasimuddin rendered a popular baul Shah Abdul Karim’s song Premer manush ghumaiya thakle.   
Guest artiste Bhajan Baul moved the crowd by presenting a couple of more songs by Lalon Shah and Shah Abdul Karim. Dil Afroz Reba sang a bhaoaia song Bania bondhu re and another Shah Abdul Karim’s popular number Amar-e keu chhoiyo na.
The festival was dedicated to the memory of recently deceased singer and researcher, Mridulkanti Chakrobarty, who was also a professor of the department.
Earlier, the  two-day  was  inaugurated  on Sunday by  Cultural Affairs Minister Abul Kalam Azad as  chief guest while  DU vice chancellor AAMS Arefin Siddique present as the special guest.
On the  first  day, students and teachers of the department rendered classical music and Bangla classics of 1960s and ‘70s on the opening day programme.
The musical programme began with a soothing voice modulation by popular classical music singer Prianka Gope, also a teacher of the department. She improvised on raga Bhairavi, one of the most beautiful ragas.
Subsequently her students joined the chorus that moved the houseful audience with a perfect beginning.
Led by another teacher of the department Mohammad Shoyeb, the students presented raga Darbari and again they successfully captivated the hearts of the audiences.
However, the main attraction of the evening was the presentation of the songs of yesteryears. In choral rendition, the students gave a spirited start of the segment with the popular song O re neel doria. Subsequently they presented two more hit numbers – Ei je akash and Pal de re noukai—in chorus.

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Salauddin Ahmed’s solo soiree enthrals audience

Cultural Correspondent

 
Salauddin Ahmed rendering Nazrul Song at a city auditorium on Saturday.
Noted Nazrul Sangeet singer Salauddin Ahmed, a mellifluous voice in the genre, was true to himself at a musical soiree held at Indira Gandhi Culture Centre’s (IGCC) Gulshan branch auditorium on Saturday evening.
Titled ‘An Evening of Nazrul Geeti, Semi Classical and Old Bangla Songs by Salauddin Ahmed’, the more-than-two-hour event was a rare treat for the Nazrul Sangeet fans as well as for the music-connoisseurs who love classical music.
Salauddin Ahmed’s solo soiree which was arranged by IGCC under the Indian High Commission in Dhaka in association with the State Bank of India, featured a total 25 renditions of Nazrul Sangeet, classical and semi classical numbers by the singer.
After reading out a brief profile of the singer, Salauddin Ahmed took the stage and flooded the entire auditorium with some harmonious Nazrul numbers including ‘Churi kore eno giri’, ‘Nid keno asena mor nayane’, ‘Phul nebe na asru nebe’, ‘Mone pore shey kon janome’ and others.
But, the soiree went to a different height and brought the entire auditorium under pin-drop silence when the veteran singer delivered classical number ‘Bari saiyan tore bina mohe’, a song learnt from his guru Ustad A Daud who played a vital role in popularising classical music in the subcontinent.
Apart from Nazrul Sangeet and classical numbers, the musical joyride also consisted of some yesteryear Bangla songs.
During his performance, Salauddin was accompanied by Sifayet Alam on tabla, Tasneem on guitar, Firoz Khan on setar and Sajeeb on keyboard as instrumentalists. Since its inception in 2010, IGCC under the High Commission of India in Dhaka has been working to promote a platform for Bangla music of different genres.
In this attempt, IGCC has arranged the solo musical soiree by Salauddin Ahmed who, through his unique and accurate rendition of Nazrul songs, won hearts of Nazrul fans and bagged numerous awards, including ‘Citycell-Channel i Music Award’ in 2008, ‘Sammilita Sahitya O Sanskritik Puroshkar’ and so on.
Salauddin Ahmed, who ventured into the world of music at a tender age, was trained in many genres of music under exponents like Nirmalendu Biswas, Ustad A Daud (for classical music) and Pandit Sukumar Mitra (for Nazrul Sangeet, Ghazal and Bhajans).
Ahmed is a ‘Special Grade’ (top) artiste of both classical music and Nazrul Sangeet and works as a music director for the Bangladesh Television and Bangladesh Betar. He has, so far, released a total of seven albums, including ‘Ek Jonomer Nohe’, ‘Elo Phooler Morshum’, ‘Bhorer Hawa’, ‘Smritir Surovi’, ‘Sindhur Bindu’, ‘Best of Salauddin Ahmed’, ‘Allahte Jar Purno Imaan’ and others.
Salauddin Ahmed, the singer with a gifted voice, is now working hard to bring out his eighth solo album which is yet to be titled. The upcoming album will feature a total of 10 oft-heard or rarely-heard songs of Nazrul.
Salauddin Ahmed, also a renowned Swaralipi (notation) writer, published two books aimed at restoring the original notations of Nazrul Geeti approved by the Nazrul Institute of Bangladesh.
Channel i was the media partner of the programme.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent

 
Salauddin Ahmed rendering Nazrul Song at a city auditorium on Saturday.
Noted Nazrul Sangeet singer Salauddin Ahmed, a mellifluous voice in the genre, was true to himself at a musical soiree held at Indira Gandhi Culture Centre’s (IGCC) Gulshan branch auditorium on Saturday evening.
Titled ‘An Evening of Nazrul Geeti, Semi Classical and Old Bangla Songs by Salauddin Ahmed’, the more-than-two-hour event was a rare treat for the Nazrul Sangeet fans as well as for the music-connoisseurs who love classical music.
Salauddin Ahmed’s solo soiree which was arranged by IGCC under the Indian High Commission in Dhaka in association with the State Bank of India, featured a total 25 renditions of Nazrul Sangeet, classical and semi classical numbers by the singer.
After reading out a brief profile of the singer, Salauddin Ahmed took the stage and flooded the entire auditorium with some harmonious Nazrul numbers including ‘Churi kore eno giri’, ‘Nid keno asena mor nayane’, ‘Phul nebe na asru nebe’, ‘Mone pore shey kon janome’ and others.
But, the soiree went to a different height and brought the entire auditorium under pin-drop silence when the veteran singer delivered classical number ‘Bari saiyan tore bina mohe’, a song learnt from his guru Ustad A Daud who played a vital role in popularising classical music in the subcontinent.
Apart from Nazrul Sangeet and classical numbers, the musical joyride also consisted of some yesteryear Bangla songs.
During his performance, Salauddin was accompanied by Sifayet Alam on tabla, Tasneem on guitar, Firoz Khan on setar and Sajeeb on keyboard as instrumentalists. Since its inception in 2010, IGCC under the High Commission of India in Dhaka has been working to promote a platform for Bangla music of different genres.
In this attempt, IGCC has arranged the solo musical soiree by Salauddin Ahmed who, through his unique and accurate rendition of Nazrul songs, won hearts of Nazrul fans and bagged numerous awards, including ‘Citycell-Channel i Music Award’ in 2008, ‘Sammilita Sahitya O Sanskritik Puroshkar’ and so on.
Salauddin Ahmed, who ventured into the world of music at a tender age, was trained in many genres of music under exponents like Nirmalendu Biswas, Ustad A Daud (for classical music) and Pandit Sukumar Mitra (for Nazrul Sangeet, Ghazal and Bhajans).
Ahmed is a ‘Special Grade’ (top) artiste of both classical music and Nazrul Sangeet and works as a music director for the Bangladesh Television and Bangladesh Betar. He has, so far, released a total of seven albums, including ‘Ek Jonomer Nohe’, ‘Elo Phooler Morshum’, ‘Bhorer Hawa’, ‘Smritir Surovi’, ‘Sindhur Bindu’, ‘Best of Salauddin Ahmed’, ‘Allahte Jar Purno Imaan’ and others.
Salauddin Ahmed, the singer with a gifted voice, is now working hard to bring out his eighth solo album which is yet to be titled. The upcoming album will feature a total of 10 oft-heard or rarely-heard songs of Nazrul.
Salauddin Ahmed, also a renowned Swaralipi (notation) writer, published two books aimed at restoring the original notations of Nazrul Geeti approved by the Nazrul Institute of Bangladesh.
Channel i was the media partner of the programme.

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Gulshan Hossain wins Int’l award

Cultural Reporter

 
Artist Gulshan Hossain recently won the first prize at the International Symposium Autumn Inspiration 2012, held at Penza in Russia. Her award winning artwork, “Reflections”, has been done in mixed media. 
The art symposium opened on August 20 and ended on September 13 and was jointly organised by UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) and ISS (International Sculpture Symposium). Around 63 artists from all over the globe took part in the event. The participating countries included France, USA, Japan, China, Ireland, Spain, Australia, Romania, South Africa, South Korea, Bulgaria, Italy, Belarus, Poland, Serbia, Ukraine, India, Russia and Bangladesh.
The organisation will keep all the artworks for their own collection and will hold a group exhibition displaying these. Each artist has contributed 20 paintings.
Gulshan’s themes are nature, nostalgia, agony, glee and beauty. The painter likes to portray nature and its mysterious aspects, and most of her works are form and colour-oriented. She tries to grasp the seasons and their characteristics in her works. She has always been enthralled by nature and changes it goes through. She believes that each season has its own language, which is closely connected with the human mind and soul.
Gulshan obtained her MFA in Painting and Drawing from Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, UK. She has had 13 solo exhibitions in UK, Belgium, India and Bangladesh and has participated in many group exhibitions. At present, she is a lecturer at Department of Painting, University of Development Alternative (UODA), Dhaka.

Comment

Cultural Reporter

 
Artist Gulshan Hossain recently won the first prize at the International Symposium Autumn Inspiration 2012, held at Penza in Russia. Her award winning artwork, “Reflections”, has been done in mixed media. 
The art symposium opened on August 20 and ended on September 13 and was jointly organised by UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) and ISS (International Sculpture Symposium). Around 63 artists from all over the globe took part in the event. The participating countries included France, USA, Japan, China, Ireland, Spain, Australia, Romania, South Africa, South Korea, Bulgaria, Italy, Belarus, Poland, Serbia, Ukraine, India, Russia and Bangladesh.
The organisation will keep all the artworks for their own collection and will hold a group exhibition displaying these. Each artist has contributed 20 paintings.
Gulshan’s themes are nature, nostalgia, agony, glee and beauty. The painter likes to portray nature and its mysterious aspects, and most of her works are form and colour-oriented. She tries to grasp the seasons and their characteristics in her works. She has always been enthralled by nature and changes it goes through. She believes that each season has its own language, which is closely connected with the human mind and soul.
Gulshan obtained her MFA in Painting and Drawing from Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, UK. She has had 13 solo exhibitions in UK, Belgium, India and Bangladesh and has participated in many group exhibitions. At present, she is a lecturer at Department of Painting, University of Development Alternative (UODA), Dhaka.

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Singer Andy Williams dies at age 84

Reuters in Missouri

 
Andy Williams, who charmed audiences with his mellow delivery of songs like “Moon River” and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You” in the 1950s and 60s, has died at his home in Branson, Missouri, his family said Wednesday. He was 84.
The blue-eyed Williams, who continued touring and drawing crowds to his Moon River Theatre in the music hub of Branson into his 80s, died on Tuesday evening after a yearlong battle with bladder cancer, his family said in a statement.
Williams had 18 gold record and three platinum hits and in his peak years was a regular on television with his own variety series.
President Ronald Reagan called his voice “a national treasure.”
Born on December 3, 1927, in tiny Wall Lake, Iowa, Williams was singing professionally with three older brothers at age 8. The Williams Brothers had steady work on radio and even sang back-up on Bing Crosby’s 1944 hit “Swinging on a Star.”
Williams went solo after the group broke up in 1951, drew attention with his appearances on “The Tonight Show” and began recording. His first No. 1 hit, “Butterfly,” came in 1957.
Later hits included “Born Free,” “Days of Wine and Roses,” “The Shadow of Your Smile,” “Can’t Get Used to Losing You,” “Solitaire,” “Music to Watch Girls By,” “Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You” and the theme from the 1970 movie hit “Love Story.”
He came upon his signature song when asked to sing “”Moon River” at the 1962 Academy Awards ceremony. Audrey Hepburn had performed the song in the movie “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” “I still love it, as many times as I’ve done it,” Williams told a British newspaper in 2007. “It has a great melody and wonderful lyrics. It’s not a bad song to have. It could have been ‘Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny Yellow Polka Dot Bikini.’ We forgot to do it one night and 27 people wanted their money back.”
Williams’ first wife was Claudine Longet, a Folies Bergere dancer he married in 1961, and they had three children before divorcing. After their split, Williams supported Longet when she was charged with fatally shooting her boyfriend, skier Spider Sabich, in 1976 in Colorado. She was convicted of negligent homicide after claiming the gun went off accidentally.
In 1992, Williams built his own 2,000-seat dinner theatre in Branson, a city of 10,000 people that had become a regional entertainment centre featuring more than 30 theatres, most of which cater to country music acts. He performed there about 20 weeks a year while also putting on a Christmas tour in the United States and occasional tour of Britain.
Williams was a Christmas fixture on US television, dressed casually in a trademark sweater, and he recorded several Christmas albums. In 2006 the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers ranked his “Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow” as the sixth most frequently performed Christmas song and “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year” as No. 11.
Williams had a strong following in Britain, where his career was revived in the late 1990s when “”Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You” and “Music to Watch Girls By” were used in television commercials. In 1991, Williams married Debbie Haas and they lived in Branson and La Quinta, California.
Williams was a close friend of the powerful Kennedy political family and sang “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” at Robert F. Kennedy’s funeral after the US senator from New York was assassinated during the 1968 presidential campaign.
Williams’ love of golf was so intense that for several years he hosted a professional tournament that bore his name.

Comment

Reuters in Missouri

 
Andy Williams, who charmed audiences with his mellow delivery of songs like “Moon River” and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You” in the 1950s and 60s, has died at his home in Branson, Missouri, his family said Wednesday. He was 84.
The blue-eyed Williams, who continued touring and drawing crowds to his Moon River Theatre in the music hub of Branson into his 80s, died on Tuesday evening after a yearlong battle with bladder cancer, his family said in a statement.
Williams had 18 gold record and three platinum hits and in his peak years was a regular on television with his own variety series.
President Ronald Reagan called his voice “a national treasure.”
Born on December 3, 1927, in tiny Wall Lake, Iowa, Williams was singing professionally with three older brothers at age 8. The Williams Brothers had steady work on radio and even sang back-up on Bing Crosby’s 1944 hit “Swinging on a Star.”
Williams went solo after the group broke up in 1951, drew attention with his appearances on “The Tonight Show” and began recording. His first No. 1 hit, “Butterfly,” came in 1957.
Later hits included “Born Free,” “Days of Wine and Roses,” “The Shadow of Your Smile,” “Can’t Get Used to Losing You,” “Solitaire,” “Music to Watch Girls By,” “Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You” and the theme from the 1970 movie hit “Love Story.”
He came upon his signature song when asked to sing “”Moon River” at the 1962 Academy Awards ceremony. Audrey Hepburn had performed the song in the movie “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” “I still love it, as many times as I’ve done it,” Williams told a British newspaper in 2007. “It has a great melody and wonderful lyrics. It’s not a bad song to have. It could have been ‘Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny Yellow Polka Dot Bikini.’ We forgot to do it one night and 27 people wanted their money back.”
Williams’ first wife was Claudine Longet, a Folies Bergere dancer he married in 1961, and they had three children before divorcing. After their split, Williams supported Longet when she was charged with fatally shooting her boyfriend, skier Spider Sabich, in 1976 in Colorado. She was convicted of negligent homicide after claiming the gun went off accidentally.
In 1992, Williams built his own 2,000-seat dinner theatre in Branson, a city of 10,000 people that had become a regional entertainment centre featuring more than 30 theatres, most of which cater to country music acts. He performed there about 20 weeks a year while also putting on a Christmas tour in the United States and occasional tour of Britain.
Williams was a Christmas fixture on US television, dressed casually in a trademark sweater, and he recorded several Christmas albums. In 2006 the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers ranked his “Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow” as the sixth most frequently performed Christmas song and “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year” as No. 11.
Williams had a strong following in Britain, where his career was revived in the late 1990s when “”Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You” and “Music to Watch Girls By” were used in television commercials. In 1991, Williams married Debbie Haas and they lived in Branson and La Quinta, California.
Williams was a close friend of the powerful Kennedy political family and sang “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” at Robert F. Kennedy’s funeral after the US senator from New York was assassinated during the 1968 presidential campaign.
Williams’ love of golf was so intense that for several years he hosted a professional tournament that bore his name.

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