Friday, March 02, 2012 CULTURE

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Rai-Krishna Padabali premiered

Artistes of Nrityanchal perform at dance drama Rai Krishna Padabali at Shilpakala Photo by Snigdha Zaman
Cultural Correspondent

 
Popular dance troupe Nrityanchal staged the premiere-show of Rai-Krishner Padabali marking 150th birth anniversary of Nobel Laureate poet Rabindranath Tagore on Friday at the National Theatre Hall of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy.
Adapted from Tagore’s Bhanusingher Padavali, Sheikh Hafizur Rahman’s dance drama had been presented by the troupe members through spectacular solo, duet and group  dance recitals incorporated with some soul-stirring Tagore songs rendered by leading Indian and Bangladeshi singers like Haimanti Shukla, Rezwana Chowdhury Banya, Manmoy Bhattyacharya, Antara Chowdhury, Joyti Chakrabarty and Aghniv Bondhapadhaya.
The experimental production directed by Indian dancer-choreographer Sukallyan Bhattyacharya featured both live and recorded dance recitals with recorded music and narration. 
Using innovative set and light design a dreamy ambience had been created to narrate legend Ratha’s eternal quest to meet lord Krishna. Mostly duet scenes between Ratha played by eminent dancer Shamim Ara Nipa and Krishna, performed by another leading dancer Shiblee Mohammad, had been presented through a projector that added a different flavour to audience.
The performance began with a spectacular devotional group dance called Pradip Arati. Subsequently the dance drama took the audience to the myth where legendary Radha had been looking for Krishna at different places at Brindaban. 
Her loneliness had been presented by brilliant solo performance by Sukallyan Bhattyacharya synchronised with the Tagore song Shyamre nipath kathin mon tor.
Using the blending forms of classical kathak and rabindra dance, Radha shared her loneliness with other characters like Gopi-gopini, Lalita, Bishakha, Brinda and Shuba. 
At one stage Shubal played by Iftekhar Kakon informed mournful Radha about the arrival of Krishna. This dramatic moment of the arrival of Krishna on a chariot and Radha’s reaction to it had been presented brilliantly by the troupe members. 
Their union, known as Rashleela according to traditional belief, had been presented in even more colourful manner.
After the show, Indian singer Haimanti Shukla, who lent voice to the character of Radha, said, ‘Nipa’s brilliant performance with my songs made me proud. Thanks to their magnificent performance, they brought Radha-Krishna legends onstage.’
‘They have given a realistic presentation of my dance-drama based on Tagore’s Bhanusingher Padavali,’ Sheikh Hafizur Rahman said.
Information and cultural affairs minister Abul Kalam Azad, who was present at the programme as chief guest, said, ‘I had the plan to leave the hall after a while of the start of the show. But, Nrityanchal’s magnificent performance forced me to watch the show till the end.’
Media personality Muhammad Jahangir, who is also an advisor to Nrityanchal, anchored the event.

Comment

Artistes of Nrityanchal perform at dance drama Rai Krishna Padabali at Shilpakala Photo by Snigdha Zaman
Cultural Correspondent

 
Popular dance troupe Nrityanchal staged the premiere-show of Rai-Krishner Padabali marking 150th birth anniversary of Nobel Laureate poet Rabindranath Tagore on Friday at the National Theatre Hall of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy.
Adapted from Tagore’s Bhanusingher Padavali, Sheikh Hafizur Rahman’s dance drama had been presented by the troupe members through spectacular solo, duet and group  dance recitals incorporated with some soul-stirring Tagore songs rendered by leading Indian and Bangladeshi singers like Haimanti Shukla, Rezwana Chowdhury Banya, Manmoy Bhattyacharya, Antara Chowdhury, Joyti Chakrabarty and Aghniv Bondhapadhaya.
The experimental production directed by Indian dancer-choreographer Sukallyan Bhattyacharya featured both live and recorded dance recitals with recorded music and narration. 
Using innovative set and light design a dreamy ambience had been created to narrate legend Ratha’s eternal quest to meet lord Krishna. Mostly duet scenes between Ratha played by eminent dancer Shamim Ara Nipa and Krishna, performed by another leading dancer Shiblee Mohammad, had been presented through a projector that added a different flavour to audience.
The performance began with a spectacular devotional group dance called Pradip Arati. Subsequently the dance drama took the audience to the myth where legendary Radha had been looking for Krishna at different places at Brindaban. 
Her loneliness had been presented by brilliant solo performance by Sukallyan Bhattyacharya synchronised with the Tagore song Shyamre nipath kathin mon tor.
Using the blending forms of classical kathak and rabindra dance, Radha shared her loneliness with other characters like Gopi-gopini, Lalita, Bishakha, Brinda and Shuba. 
At one stage Shubal played by Iftekhar Kakon informed mournful Radha about the arrival of Krishna. This dramatic moment of the arrival of Krishna on a chariot and Radha’s reaction to it had been presented brilliantly by the troupe members. 
Their union, known as Rashleela according to traditional belief, had been presented in even more colourful manner.
After the show, Indian singer Haimanti Shukla, who lent voice to the character of Radha, said, ‘Nipa’s brilliant performance with my songs made me proud. Thanks to their magnificent performance, they brought Radha-Krishna legends onstage.’
‘They have given a realistic presentation of my dance-drama based on Tagore’s Bhanusingher Padavali,’ Sheikh Hafizur Rahman said.
Information and cultural affairs minister Abul Kalam Azad, who was present at the programme as chief guest, said, ‘I had the plan to leave the hall after a while of the start of the show. But, Nrityanchal’s magnificent performance forced me to watch the show till the end.’
Media personality Muhammad Jahangir, who is also an advisor to Nrityanchal, anchored the event.

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Silent film ‘The Artist’ crowned with Oscar gold 

Oscar winning artistes at the venue

Agence France-Presse, Hollywood

Silent movie ‘The Artist’ crowned its spectacular awards season success by winning five Oscars including the coveted Best Picture prize at the 84th Academy Awards on Sunday.
The French-directed black-and-white movie earned Oscars for best director for Michel Hazanavicius and best actor for Jean Dujardin, who played a silent movie era star whose career was torpedoed by the arrival of the ‘talkies.’
‘I love your country,’ Dujardin told the Hollywood audience as he accepted his Oscar, the first for a French actor.
After thanking the film’s cast and crew — adding to ‘my wife, I love you’ — he broke into French, using an expletive and then saying, ‘Great! Thank you very much!’
In Paris, the president, Nicolas Sarkozy, hailed the French film’s Oscar triumph as a sign of the ‘tremendous success of French cinema and quality cinema.’ The movie’s success was ‘witness to the exceptional vitality of our cinema and the success of the government’s policies to support the excellence of this major French industry,’ he said.
Martin Scorsese’s 3D adventure ‘Hugo’ — which had the most nominations, with 11 compared to 10 for ‘The Artist’ — also ended the evening with five prizes, but all of them came in technical categories.
Meryl Streep won best actress for her powerful turn as former British premier Margaret Thatcher in ‘The Iron Lady,’ earning a standing ovation from the A-list Hollywood audience.
It was the third Oscar for the 62-year-old Streep and her first in three decades, underscoring her status as the pre-eminent actress of her generation.
‘When they called my name, I had this feeling I could hear half of America going, ‘Oh no. Come on ... Her, again?’ You know. But, whatever!’ she said, rolling her eyes.
Octavia Spencer took home the prize for best supporting actress for her role as a black maid in the civil rights drama ‘The Help,’ receiving a standing ovation for her powerhouse performance.
Veteran Canadian actor Christopher Plummer crowned a six-decade acting career with a long-overdue Oscar, a best supporting actor trophy for his role in ‘Beginners’ as an ailing widower who embraces his homosexuality.
Kissing his coveted golden statuette, he joked: ‘You’re only two years older than me, darling — where have you been all my life?’ adding that he had been rehearsing his Oscar acceptance speech since he was born.
Hollywood’s biggest and most glittering night had long been expected to be a battle between ‘Hugo’ and ‘The Artist,’ two odes to film-making.
Other winners included the Johnny-Depp voiced ‘Rango,’ which won the best animated feature prize, and Woody Allen, who was honoured for best original screenplay for ‘Midnight in Paris.’
In the foreign language category, Iran’s ‘A Separation’ beat films from Belgium, Canada, Israel and Poland as expected.
Its director Asghar Farhadi dedicated the award to Iranians ‘who despise hostility and resentment,’ and referred to current tension between Tehran and the West over the Islamic republic’s suspect nuclear programme.
Scorsese was not the only legendary director in the mix — Allen was in the running for best picture honours for ‘Midnight in Paris,’ and Steven Spielberg gunned for the top prize with ‘War Horse.’
Buddies George Clooney and Brad Pitt both lost out to Dujardin, who had already won a slew of awards for his turn as suave George Valentin.
Clooney had downplayed his hopes of winning best actor before the show, saying on the red carpet: ‘I have a feeling in the best actor race you’re going to hear someone speaking French.’
The show was presented by a galaxy of stars, including last year’s best actress and actor Natalie Portman and Colin Firth, Tom Cruise, Penelope Cruz, Tom Hanks and Angelina Jolie.
Highlights included a breathtaking cinema-themed performance by Canadian dance troupe Cirque du Soleil, including rapid-fire acrobatics and tumbling across the stage and ceiling of the auditorium.
‘Wow,’ said veteran host Billy Crystal, presenting the show for the ninth time. ‘I pulled a hamstring just watching that.’
The spectacle had begun even before the curtain went up, with the usual procession of stars in glittering gowns on the red carpet leading into the Oscars, the climax of Hollywood’s annual awards season.
British comic Sacha Baron Cohen also pulled a colorful stunt, coming dressed as the star of his latest movie, ‘The Dictator’—and pouring the faux ashes of late North Korean leader Jim Kong-Il onto the red carpet.

Comment

Oscar winning artistes at the venue

Agence France-Presse, Hollywood

Silent movie ‘The Artist’ crowned its spectacular awards season success by winning five Oscars including the coveted Best Picture prize at the 84th Academy Awards on Sunday.
The French-directed black-and-white movie earned Oscars for best director for Michel Hazanavicius and best actor for Jean Dujardin, who played a silent movie era star whose career was torpedoed by the arrival of the ‘talkies.’
‘I love your country,’ Dujardin told the Hollywood audience as he accepted his Oscar, the first for a French actor.
After thanking the film’s cast and crew — adding to ‘my wife, I love you’ — he broke into French, using an expletive and then saying, ‘Great! Thank you very much!’
In Paris, the president, Nicolas Sarkozy, hailed the French film’s Oscar triumph as a sign of the ‘tremendous success of French cinema and quality cinema.’ The movie’s success was ‘witness to the exceptional vitality of our cinema and the success of the government’s policies to support the excellence of this major French industry,’ he said.
Martin Scorsese’s 3D adventure ‘Hugo’ — which had the most nominations, with 11 compared to 10 for ‘The Artist’ — also ended the evening with five prizes, but all of them came in technical categories.
Meryl Streep won best actress for her powerful turn as former British premier Margaret Thatcher in ‘The Iron Lady,’ earning a standing ovation from the A-list Hollywood audience.
It was the third Oscar for the 62-year-old Streep and her first in three decades, underscoring her status as the pre-eminent actress of her generation.
‘When they called my name, I had this feeling I could hear half of America going, ‘Oh no. Come on ... Her, again?’ You know. But, whatever!’ she said, rolling her eyes.
Octavia Spencer took home the prize for best supporting actress for her role as a black maid in the civil rights drama ‘The Help,’ receiving a standing ovation for her powerhouse performance.
Veteran Canadian actor Christopher Plummer crowned a six-decade acting career with a long-overdue Oscar, a best supporting actor trophy for his role in ‘Beginners’ as an ailing widower who embraces his homosexuality.
Kissing his coveted golden statuette, he joked: ‘You’re only two years older than me, darling — where have you been all my life?’ adding that he had been rehearsing his Oscar acceptance speech since he was born.
Hollywood’s biggest and most glittering night had long been expected to be a battle between ‘Hugo’ and ‘The Artist,’ two odes to film-making.
Other winners included the Johnny-Depp voiced ‘Rango,’ which won the best animated feature prize, and Woody Allen, who was honoured for best original screenplay for ‘Midnight in Paris.’
In the foreign language category, Iran’s ‘A Separation’ beat films from Belgium, Canada, Israel and Poland as expected.
Its director Asghar Farhadi dedicated the award to Iranians ‘who despise hostility and resentment,’ and referred to current tension between Tehran and the West over the Islamic republic’s suspect nuclear programme.
Scorsese was not the only legendary director in the mix — Allen was in the running for best picture honours for ‘Midnight in Paris,’ and Steven Spielberg gunned for the top prize with ‘War Horse.’
Buddies George Clooney and Brad Pitt both lost out to Dujardin, who had already won a slew of awards for his turn as suave George Valentin.
Clooney had downplayed his hopes of winning best actor before the show, saying on the red carpet: ‘I have a feeling in the best actor race you’re going to hear someone speaking French.’
The show was presented by a galaxy of stars, including last year’s best actress and actor Natalie Portman and Colin Firth, Tom Cruise, Penelope Cruz, Tom Hanks and Angelina Jolie.
Highlights included a breathtaking cinema-themed performance by Canadian dance troupe Cirque du Soleil, including rapid-fire acrobatics and tumbling across the stage and ceiling of the auditorium.
‘Wow,’ said veteran host Billy Crystal, presenting the show for the ninth time. ‘I pulled a hamstring just watching that.’
The spectacle had begun even before the curtain went up, with the usual procession of stars in glittering gowns on the red carpet leading into the Oscars, the climax of Hollywood’s annual awards season.
British comic Sacha Baron Cohen also pulled a colorful stunt, coming dressed as the star of his latest movie, ‘The Dictator’—and pouring the faux ashes of late North Korean leader Jim Kong-Il onto the red carpet.

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Texture and colour in mindscape

Distinguished guests and artist Maksuda Iqbal Nipa at the exhibition

Musfequr Rahman

Maksuda Iqbal Nipa’s oil painting exhibition titled ‘Texture and Colour in Mindscape’ was held at the Bengal Art Lounge at Gulshan.A total of 25 abstract paintings were put on display at her sixth solo exhibition exploring human emotions on canvases. Her vivid paintings showed controlled explosion of blue, yellow, green and red having multiple layers on canvases and especial textures and lines done by brushes, spatulas and varied tools brought dimensions to the lively surface of the paintings. Without specific outline of paintings, unfettered mind of Nipa guides her feelings to play with colour and content on canvases. Most of the paintings belonged to abstract expressionism that display vitality. Her painstaking oil paintings prove her devotion and intimacy for the oil medium.
In the painting Floating Leaves, Nipa depicts sparkling yellow, green leaves on a surface of a serene waterbody representing tranquillity. 
Artist Nipa in her blue-dominated painting Agony depicts various restless motions of living beings in invisible sorrow and pains. 
Empathetic artist Nipa’s painting Sunshine shows thick brush strokes of yellow, blue and crimson going upwards presenting the essence and magnitude of sunshine. 
Her Field of Yellow, Surface with Yellow and Orange, Land Form, Field of Yellow and Just Scrabbling show her restless journey to search out peace and tranquility amid a chaotic world transporting them into paintings.
Maksuda Iqbal Nipa completed her BFA degree from the department of Drawing and Painting of the Institute of Fine Arts of Dhaka University in 1996. She completed post-graduate research course and higher studies in oil painting and fine arts from Aichi University of Education in Japan in 2004.
Begun on February 19, the exhibition was wrapped up on March 1.

Comment

Distinguished guests and artist Maksuda Iqbal Nipa at the exhibition

Musfequr Rahman

Maksuda Iqbal Nipa’s oil painting exhibition titled ‘Texture and Colour in Mindscape’ was held at the Bengal Art Lounge at Gulshan.A total of 25 abstract paintings were put on display at her sixth solo exhibition exploring human emotions on canvases. Her vivid paintings showed controlled explosion of blue, yellow, green and red having multiple layers on canvases and especial textures and lines done by brushes, spatulas and varied tools brought dimensions to the lively surface of the paintings. Without specific outline of paintings, unfettered mind of Nipa guides her feelings to play with colour and content on canvases. Most of the paintings belonged to abstract expressionism that display vitality. Her painstaking oil paintings prove her devotion and intimacy for the oil medium.
In the painting Floating Leaves, Nipa depicts sparkling yellow, green leaves on a surface of a serene waterbody representing tranquillity. 
Artist Nipa in her blue-dominated painting Agony depicts various restless motions of living beings in invisible sorrow and pains. 
Empathetic artist Nipa’s painting Sunshine shows thick brush strokes of yellow, blue and crimson going upwards presenting the essence and magnitude of sunshine. 
Her Field of Yellow, Surface with Yellow and Orange, Land Form, Field of Yellow and Just Scrabbling show her restless journey to search out peace and tranquility amid a chaotic world transporting them into paintings.
Maksuda Iqbal Nipa completed her BFA degree from the department of Drawing and Painting of the Institute of Fine Arts of Dhaka University in 1996. She completed post-graduate research course and higher studies in oil painting and fine arts from Aichi University of Education in Japan in 2004.
Begun on February 19, the exhibition was wrapped up on March 1.

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Humayun’s Debi staged at Shilpakala

Misir Ali and Ranu at the play
Musfequr Rahman

 
Bahubachan Theatre staged the 55th show of its successful production Debi, an adaptation from eminent novelist Humayun Ahmed’s novel of the same title on Monday at the Experimental Theatre Hall of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy.
Dramatised by Mohammad Iqbal Hossain and directed by Arham Alo, the play zooms a young beautiful housewife, Ranu, who has some extraordinary power to predict the future, hearing sounds and sensing smell from nonexistent objects. Runu’s beloved husband Anis becomes worried about her mental health. Subsequently, the story gets momentum when the couple meet mysterious psychiatrist Misir Ali to treat and cure her. 
The presentation of the story on stage lacked suspense and thrill. However, mystery was infused in a few scenes with backstage vocals and movements of actors wearing black dominated white attires on stage. Except confident and rational Misir Ali, all the characters were frail and confused. Using his rational and analytical powers, Misir Ali gradually interpreted inconsistent and irrational attitude of Ranu based on few unexpected and detestable experiences she had endured in early life. 
Ranu dipped in a serious perplexity and sought to save innocent Nilu. In the classroom, Misir Ali traces the existence of Ranu into her student Nilu and confesses the continuity of the case of Ranu.
The flat and monotonous set design on stage was inadequate to depict the mysterious character of Misir Ali. Moreover, the light design failed to interact with message of the play which explores the conflict between conscious and subconscious mind of individuals.

Comment

Misir Ali and Ranu at the play
Musfequr Rahman

 
Bahubachan Theatre staged the 55th show of its successful production Debi, an adaptation from eminent novelist Humayun Ahmed’s novel of the same title on Monday at the Experimental Theatre Hall of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy.
Dramatised by Mohammad Iqbal Hossain and directed by Arham Alo, the play zooms a young beautiful housewife, Ranu, who has some extraordinary power to predict the future, hearing sounds and sensing smell from nonexistent objects. Runu’s beloved husband Anis becomes worried about her mental health. Subsequently, the story gets momentum when the couple meet mysterious psychiatrist Misir Ali to treat and cure her. 
The presentation of the story on stage lacked suspense and thrill. However, mystery was infused in a few scenes with backstage vocals and movements of actors wearing black dominated white attires on stage. Except confident and rational Misir Ali, all the characters were frail and confused. Using his rational and analytical powers, Misir Ali gradually interpreted inconsistent and irrational attitude of Ranu based on few unexpected and detestable experiences she had endured in early life. 
Ranu dipped in a serious perplexity and sought to save innocent Nilu. In the classroom, Misir Ali traces the existence of Ranu into her student Nilu and confesses the continuity of the case of Ranu.
The flat and monotonous set design on stage was inadequate to depict the mysterious character of Misir Ali. Moreover, the light design failed to interact with message of the play which explores the conflict between conscious and subconscious mind of individuals.

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Filmmaker Alamgir Kumkum dies

Cultural Correspondent 

 
Celebrated filmmaker and cultural organiser Alamgir Kumkum died at a city hospital on Monday. 
He has long been suffering from diabetes, kidney-related problems and some other diseases. He was 68.
Alamgir is survived by wife, a son, one daughter and a host of relatives, admirers and well-wishers to mourn his death.
He was laid to rest at Banani Graveyard after Zohr prayers on Tuesday
The great filmmaker, also a valiant freedom fighter, directed around 40 movies, including ‘Amar Janmabhumi’, based on the war of liberation.
Born at Sameshpur of Sripur in Munshiganj, Alamgir made his debut as a filmmaker in 1969 with the screening of Padma Nadir Majhi, based on the popular novel of Manik Bandopadhya.
Amarsangi, Aguner Alo, Jhumka, Kabin, Mayer Doa, Mamata, Jibon Chhabi, Gunda, Sonar Cheyeo Daami and Rajbondi are among the super-hit films directed by him.
He was former cultural affairs secretary of Bangladesh Awami League central committee and involved with Chhatra League during his student life. He made outstanding contributions to the war of liberation, democratic movements and the country’s cultural movement.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent 

 
Celebrated filmmaker and cultural organiser Alamgir Kumkum died at a city hospital on Monday. 
He has long been suffering from diabetes, kidney-related problems and some other diseases. He was 68.
Alamgir is survived by wife, a son, one daughter and a host of relatives, admirers and well-wishers to mourn his death.
He was laid to rest at Banani Graveyard after Zohr prayers on Tuesday
The great filmmaker, also a valiant freedom fighter, directed around 40 movies, including ‘Amar Janmabhumi’, based on the war of liberation.
Born at Sameshpur of Sripur in Munshiganj, Alamgir made his debut as a filmmaker in 1969 with the screening of Padma Nadir Majhi, based on the popular novel of Manik Bandopadhya.
Amarsangi, Aguner Alo, Jhumka, Kabin, Mayer Doa, Mamata, Jibon Chhabi, Gunda, Sonar Cheyeo Daami and Rajbondi are among the super-hit films directed by him.
He was former cultural affairs secretary of Bangladesh Awami League central committee and involved with Chhatra League during his student life. He made outstanding contributions to the war of liberation, democratic movements and the country’s cultural movement.

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Discussion on Dhaka art summit held at Chitrak

Cultural Correspondent 

 
On the occasion of the forthcoming First Dhaka Art Summit summit, a discussion program was held on February 19 at Gallery Chitrak in Dhanmondi. The speakers shared their thoughts and views about the upcoming summit which will be held from April 12 to 15 in the city.
Foreign affairs secretary Mizarul Kayes, accomplished artist Syed Jahangir and Monirul Islam, convener of Summit Steering Committee artist Mohammad Moniruzzaman, Bengal Gallery of Fine Arts director Subir Chowdhury, founder and trustee of Samdani Art Foundation Rajeeb Samdani and director of Dhaka Art Summit Nadia Samdani spoke at the program.
Samdani Art Foundation-a non-profit art infrastructure development organization- in collaboration with Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy and Bangladesh National Museum, will organize the summit. 
Targeting the Summit, Samdani Art Foundation will also be presenting two awards namely; Samdani Artist Development Award (BDT 1 million) and Samdani Young Talent Award (BDT 0.5 Million). Artists within the age range of 20-35 only are allowed to apply.
The main venue of the summit will be the Bangladesh National Museum and Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy. There will be several other venues all over the city celebrating the summit through exhibitions, curatorial shows, seminars, presentations, etc. Such initiative has been taken where all the artworks of artists starting from the masters to the eminent and emerging artists are being displayed under one roof. Along with the artists, the summit is also bringing in all the local galleries and art organizations to display the vibrant art scene of Bangladesh.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent 

 
On the occasion of the forthcoming First Dhaka Art Summit summit, a discussion program was held on February 19 at Gallery Chitrak in Dhanmondi. The speakers shared their thoughts and views about the upcoming summit which will be held from April 12 to 15 in the city.
Foreign affairs secretary Mizarul Kayes, accomplished artist Syed Jahangir and Monirul Islam, convener of Summit Steering Committee artist Mohammad Moniruzzaman, Bengal Gallery of Fine Arts director Subir Chowdhury, founder and trustee of Samdani Art Foundation Rajeeb Samdani and director of Dhaka Art Summit Nadia Samdani spoke at the program.
Samdani Art Foundation-a non-profit art infrastructure development organization- in collaboration with Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy and Bangladesh National Museum, will organize the summit. 
Targeting the Summit, Samdani Art Foundation will also be presenting two awards namely; Samdani Artist Development Award (BDT 1 million) and Samdani Young Talent Award (BDT 0.5 Million). Artists within the age range of 20-35 only are allowed to apply.
The main venue of the summit will be the Bangladesh National Museum and Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy. There will be several other venues all over the city celebrating the summit through exhibitions, curatorial shows, seminars, presentations, etc. Such initiative has been taken where all the artworks of artists starting from the masters to the eminent and emerging artists are being displayed under one roof. Along with the artists, the summit is also bringing in all the local galleries and art organizations to display the vibrant art scene of Bangladesh.

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 BOOK REVIEW 

Bangladesh: A Study of the Democratic Regimes

 Bangladesh: A Study of the Democratic Regimes is the Moudud Ahmed’s fifth book on the politics of Bangladesh. It essentially covers the period from 1991 to 2006 and focuses on a number of important issues including constitutional amendments and legislative reforms which have had considerable impact on the political process of the country. It encompasses with depth and precision all the developments in politics, economy, decentralization and politicization of administration that help in understanding the historical process of the concepts underscored here. It is a UPL publication.

Many of these changes are beneficial but some have become controversial and need a rethink in the contexts of the developing political culture. The book’s other important and very informative parts include a discussion on the changes to the legal system and the growing politicization of the judiciary—a subject with which the author is most intimately associated and one which will have a long term impact for better or worse on the growth of all democratic institutions in the country.
His views on the more contemporary issues such as the character of political parties is thoughtful and provides a fairly comprehensive narration of the defining political events during this period. He has adequately covered the ground by providing front narration on the behaviors of political parties, the law and order situation including extra judicial killings and questions pertaining to indemnity.
Moudud Ahmed, remains a critical political analyst in all situations—both while in government or in the opposition. He has reconstructed a remarkably well-researched account of over the last 20 years. Despite the expanse of the canvas on which he worked, nothing of significance escaped his notice.
Moudud Ahmed is presently a Member of Parliament. Earlier he had been Deputy Prime Minister under President Ziaur Rahman; Prime Minister, and Vice-President under President HM Ershad. Ahmed was minister for Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs in the last government of Begum Khaleda Zia. A seasoned parliamentarian, Moudud Ahmed not only displayed extraordinary political acumen in the contemporary factional politics of Bangladesh, but has also written and published extensively and dispassionately on national, regional and international issues.
He has been a Fellow at the universities of Heidelberg (1976, 1980, 1996, 2009 and 2010), Oxford (1993), Harvard (1981, 1998 and 2011), and a Visiting Professor at the Elliott School of The George Washington University (1997). His published books include: Bangladesh: Constitutional Quest for Autonomy (Dhaka: UPL, 1976), Bangladesh: Era of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman (Dhaka: UPL, 1983), Democracy and the Challenge of Development: A Study of Politics and Military interventions in Bangladesh (Dhaka: UPL, 1995), and South Asia: Crisis of Development—The Case of Bangladesh (Dhaka: UPL, 2002).

Comment

 Bangladesh: A Study of the Democratic Regimes is the Moudud Ahmed’s fifth book on the politics of Bangladesh. It essentially covers the period from 1991 to 2006 and focuses on a number of important issues including constitutional amendments and legislative reforms which have had considerable impact on the political process of the country. It encompasses with depth and precision all the developments in politics, economy, decentralization and politicization of administration that help in understanding the historical process of the concepts underscored here. It is a UPL publication.

Many of these changes are beneficial but some have become controversial and need a rethink in the contexts of the developing political culture. The book’s other important and very informative parts include a discussion on the changes to the legal system and the growing politicization of the judiciary—a subject with which the author is most intimately associated and one which will have a long term impact for better or worse on the growth of all democratic institutions in the country.
His views on the more contemporary issues such as the character of political parties is thoughtful and provides a fairly comprehensive narration of the defining political events during this period. He has adequately covered the ground by providing front narration on the behaviors of political parties, the law and order situation including extra judicial killings and questions pertaining to indemnity.
Moudud Ahmed, remains a critical political analyst in all situations—both while in government or in the opposition. He has reconstructed a remarkably well-researched account of over the last 20 years. Despite the expanse of the canvas on which he worked, nothing of significance escaped his notice.
Moudud Ahmed is presently a Member of Parliament. Earlier he had been Deputy Prime Minister under President Ziaur Rahman; Prime Minister, and Vice-President under President HM Ershad. Ahmed was minister for Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs in the last government of Begum Khaleda Zia. A seasoned parliamentarian, Moudud Ahmed not only displayed extraordinary political acumen in the contemporary factional politics of Bangladesh, but has also written and published extensively and dispassionately on national, regional and international issues.
He has been a Fellow at the universities of Heidelberg (1976, 1980, 1996, 2009 and 2010), Oxford (1993), Harvard (1981, 1998 and 2011), and a Visiting Professor at the Elliott School of The George Washington University (1997). His published books include: Bangladesh: Constitutional Quest for Autonomy (Dhaka: UPL, 1976), Bangladesh: Era of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman (Dhaka: UPL, 1983), Democracy and the Challenge of Development: A Study of Politics and Military interventions in Bangladesh (Dhaka: UPL, 1995), and South Asia: Crisis of Development—The Case of Bangladesh (Dhaka: UPL, 2002).

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