Friday, August 12, 2011 CULTURE

Skip Navigation Links
 
link
 
link
SUPPLEMENT
Visitor Login










Tagore’s 70th death anniv observed

Special Correspondent

The 70th death anniversary of Nobel laureate poet Rabindranath Tagore, who reshaped the Bangla literature in late 19th and early 20th century, was observed in the country on Saturday.
   Tagore, the first non-European litterateur who won the Nobel prize in 1913, was a poet, playwright, novelist, educationist, social reformer, artist and music composer.
   He wrote the national anthems of Bangladesh and India. In music, he created a genre of his own called the Tagore Songs.
   The country’s socio-cultural organisations observed the day with sessions of his songs, recitation of his poems and discussions on his life and work.
   Marking Tagore’s death anniversary, Shilpakala Academy arranged a discussion and cultural function at 10am at National Music and Dance Centre of the Academy. Academy director general, Liakat Ali Lucky, presided over the function.
   Bangla Academy arranged lecture and cultural function in its seminar room at 11am on August 7. Professor Karunamoy Goswami delivered the lecture titled ‘Real life in Rabindranath’s symbolic drama’.
   Academy director general Shamsuzzaman Khan delivered the welcome address, while academy chairman Kabir Chowdhury presided over the programme.
   Rabindranath was born on May 7, 1861 (Baishakh 25, 1268) at Thakurbari of Jorasanko in Kolkata, and died on August 7, 1941 (Sraban 22, 1348) at the age of 80.
   This year, the death anniversary of Tagore, however, observed in West Bengal on Sunday as the Bangla calendar in use in Bangladesh was changed in 1988 in line with a modification done by a Bangla Academy committee headed by Dr Muhammad Shahidullah in 1963.
   A towering figure in Bangla literature, he had enriched Bangla culture and literature for more than six decades with more than 2,500 songs, 28 collections of poems, plays, dance dramas, short stories, novels and essays.
   In 1919 Tagore renounced his knighthood, which was conferred on him by British government in 1915 in recognition of his literary achievements, protesting at the massacre at Jallianwallah Bagh.
   In 1940, Oxford University arranged a special ceremony at Santiniketan to honour the poet with the Doctorate of Literature.
   Tagore founded the Visva-Bharati University and modernised Bengali art by spurning rigid classical forms.
   Newspapers will bring out special supplements on Tagore’s work and life. The electronic media will air special programmes, including soirees, recitation from his poems, discussions, film shows and dramas scripted or based on Tagore’s stories.

Comment

Special Correspondent

The 70th death anniversary of Nobel laureate poet Rabindranath Tagore, who reshaped the Bangla literature in late 19th and early 20th century, was observed in the country on Saturday.
   Tagore, the first non-European litterateur who won the Nobel prize in 1913, was a poet, playwright, novelist, educationist, social reformer, artist and music composer.
   He wrote the national anthems of Bangladesh and India. In music, he created a genre of his own called the Tagore Songs.
   The country’s socio-cultural organisations observed the day with sessions of his songs, recitation of his poems and discussions on his life and work.
   Marking Tagore’s death anniversary, Shilpakala Academy arranged a discussion and cultural function at 10am at National Music and Dance Centre of the Academy. Academy director general, Liakat Ali Lucky, presided over the function.
   Bangla Academy arranged lecture and cultural function in its seminar room at 11am on August 7. Professor Karunamoy Goswami delivered the lecture titled ‘Real life in Rabindranath’s symbolic drama’.
   Academy director general Shamsuzzaman Khan delivered the welcome address, while academy chairman Kabir Chowdhury presided over the programme.
   Rabindranath was born on May 7, 1861 (Baishakh 25, 1268) at Thakurbari of Jorasanko in Kolkata, and died on August 7, 1941 (Sraban 22, 1348) at the age of 80.
   This year, the death anniversary of Tagore, however, observed in West Bengal on Sunday as the Bangla calendar in use in Bangladesh was changed in 1988 in line with a modification done by a Bangla Academy committee headed by Dr Muhammad Shahidullah in 1963.
   A towering figure in Bangla literature, he had enriched Bangla culture and literature for more than six decades with more than 2,500 songs, 28 collections of poems, plays, dance dramas, short stories, novels and essays.
   In 1919 Tagore renounced his knighthood, which was conferred on him by British government in 1915 in recognition of his literary achievements, protesting at the massacre at Jallianwallah Bagh.
   In 1940, Oxford University arranged a special ceremony at Santiniketan to honour the poet with the Doctorate of Literature.
   Tagore founded the Visva-Bharati University and modernised Bengali art by spurning rigid classical forms.
   Newspapers will bring out special supplements on Tagore’s work and life. The electronic media will air special programmes, including soirees, recitation from his poems, discussions, film shows and dramas scripted or based on Tagore’s stories.


Login to post comments


(0)



Popularising Tagore’s works through dance

Musfequr Rahman

Sharmila Banerjee is one of the pioneers to popularise dance recitals based on Tagore’s works. Sharmila has credited with composition of Tagore dance drama and lyrical plays including Shama, Chandalika, Chitrangada, Balmiki Protibha and Mayar Khela.
   ‘Rabindrik dance, unlike the other traditional and classical dance forms, is very special to us as it originated in Bengal. Tagore started using dance in his plays, as a medium to articulately express the intense human emotions,’ said Sharmila.
   It does not mean that Sharmila only concentrate on Tagore’s works these days. She has been involved with composing experimental dance recitals, teaching students classical dance in Chhayanaut and different organisational activities: she is the head of the creative and dance presentation department of Bangladesh Chapter of World Dance Alliance and vice president of Bangladesh Dance Artistes’ Association.
   For her contribution in dance Sharmila has been awarded with numerous prizes including prestigious ‘World Master’ recognition at the Asia Festival held at Seoul of South Korea, Meril- Prothom Alo award, Mohila Parishad Honourary Award, Gauhar Jamil Award and others.
   Sharing the secret of her success, she said her dedication, hard work and strong basics under the guidance of the master dancers such Bipin Singh, Kelucharan Mohapatra, Kolabati Devi and Darshana Jhaveri, helped her to come at this stage.
   ‘I apply my own method in my performances and sometimes, my students also adopt those. I fuse modern and Rabindrik dance forms with classical forms and focus on the integration of body and mind,’ said Sharmila.
   According to Sharmila Banerjee she started her journey in the cultural arena as both singer and dancer from childhood in Chittagong. ‘During the war of independence, we, artistes of Mukti Sangrami Shilpi Sangstha, recorded patriotic and inspirational songs for the Swadhin Bangla Betar Kendra,’ said Sharmila.
   She got intense training in dance at the Udaysankar Indian Cultural Centre at Kolkata. In 1978, she received scholarship from Indian Council for Cultural Relations and got trained in classical dance in Sangeet Bhaban of Shantiniketan University. After securing first class first position there she began higher studies on Bharatnatyam dance in Kolkata.
   She returned Dhaka in 1987 and joined as teacher at Chhayanaut Sangskritik Bhaban, said Sharmila. In 1990, Sharmila established her dance school Nityanandan and focused on creative dance besides classical dance form.
   Sharing her notable creative productions Sharmila mentioned Rupantarer Gaan based on the spirit of liberation war and Somudre Swapno— an adaptation from Henrik Ibsen’s The Lady from the Sea.

Comment

Musfequr Rahman

Sharmila Banerjee is one of the pioneers to popularise dance recitals based on Tagore’s works. Sharmila has credited with composition of Tagore dance drama and lyrical plays including Shama, Chandalika, Chitrangada, Balmiki Protibha and Mayar Khela.
   ‘Rabindrik dance, unlike the other traditional and classical dance forms, is very special to us as it originated in Bengal. Tagore started using dance in his plays, as a medium to articulately express the intense human emotions,’ said Sharmila.
   It does not mean that Sharmila only concentrate on Tagore’s works these days. She has been involved with composing experimental dance recitals, teaching students classical dance in Chhayanaut and different organisational activities: she is the head of the creative and dance presentation department of Bangladesh Chapter of World Dance Alliance and vice president of Bangladesh Dance Artistes’ Association.
   For her contribution in dance Sharmila has been awarded with numerous prizes including prestigious ‘World Master’ recognition at the Asia Festival held at Seoul of South Korea, Meril- Prothom Alo award, Mohila Parishad Honourary Award, Gauhar Jamil Award and others.
   Sharing the secret of her success, she said her dedication, hard work and strong basics under the guidance of the master dancers such Bipin Singh, Kelucharan Mohapatra, Kolabati Devi and Darshana Jhaveri, helped her to come at this stage.
   ‘I apply my own method in my performances and sometimes, my students also adopt those. I fuse modern and Rabindrik dance forms with classical forms and focus on the integration of body and mind,’ said Sharmila.
   According to Sharmila Banerjee she started her journey in the cultural arena as both singer and dancer from childhood in Chittagong. ‘During the war of independence, we, artistes of Mukti Sangrami Shilpi Sangstha, recorded patriotic and inspirational songs for the Swadhin Bangla Betar Kendra,’ said Sharmila.
   She got intense training in dance at the Udaysankar Indian Cultural Centre at Kolkata. In 1978, she received scholarship from Indian Council for Cultural Relations and got trained in classical dance in Sangeet Bhaban of Shantiniketan University. After securing first class first position there she began higher studies on Bharatnatyam dance in Kolkata.
   She returned Dhaka in 1987 and joined as teacher at Chhayanaut Sangskritik Bhaban, said Sharmila. In 1990, Sharmila established her dance school Nityanandan and focused on creative dance besides classical dance form.
   Sharing her notable creative productions Sharmila mentioned Rupantarer Gaan based on the spirit of liberation war and Somudre Swapno— an adaptation from Henrik Ibsen’s The Lady from the Sea.


Login to post comments


(0)



BANGLA ACADEMY OBSERVES TAGORE’S DEATH ANNIV

Use of symbols in Tagore’s plays analysed

Cultural Correspondent

Bangla Academy organised a discussion and cultural programme on Sunday at the seminar hall of the academy to observe the 70th death anniversary of Nobel Laureate poet Rabindranath Tagore.
   Professor Karunamoy Goshwami presented the key note paper titled ‘Rabindranath-er Sangketik Natokey Bastab Jibon’ (portrayal of real life in the symbolic plays of Rabindranath). National professor Kabir Chowdhury delivered a speech as chief guest while Bangla Academy director general Shamsuzzaman Khan delivered welcome speech.
   During presenting the key-note paper, Goshwami analysed Tagore’s use of symbols in his plays including Tasher Desh, Achalayatan, Prakritir Pratishad, Raja, Phalguni, Muktadhara and Raktakarabi. Goshwami said, ‘These symbols easily communicate with the audience, since those are relevant to society.’
   Mentioning Raktokarobi as one of the most prominent symbolic plays by Tagore, Goshwami said, ‘Tagore used the spirit of womanhood as the symbol of the power of welfare. Nandini, the protagonist of Raktokarobi, succeeded in infusing that power in the self-aggrandize and plundering spirit of Makhar Raj, the King.’
   He further described Tagore’s thoughtful application of playing cards in the play Tasher Desh. ‘Tagore personified the inhabitants of the materialistic society who are guided by strict rules and disciplines, not by emotions, with playing cards. By the play, Tagore actually indicated the then British rule over India and inspired the people to fight against the rule.’
   Kabir Chowdhury said, ‘The use of symbols in the plays of Tagore is artistic and very relevant to the reality.’ The discussion session was followed by a musical programme in which leading Tagore singers Sadi Mohammad and Adity Mohsin enthralled the audiences with their solo performances.
   Sadi Mohammad rendered Tagore songs Samukhey shantir parabar and Emono dine tare bola jay. Adity Mohsin rendered two monsoon songs of Tagore such as Badol diner prothomo kadomo phul and Megher pore megh jomechhe.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent

Bangla Academy organised a discussion and cultural programme on Sunday at the seminar hall of the academy to observe the 70th death anniversary of Nobel Laureate poet Rabindranath Tagore.
   Professor Karunamoy Goshwami presented the key note paper titled ‘Rabindranath-er Sangketik Natokey Bastab Jibon’ (portrayal of real life in the symbolic plays of Rabindranath). National professor Kabir Chowdhury delivered a speech as chief guest while Bangla Academy director general Shamsuzzaman Khan delivered welcome speech.
   During presenting the key-note paper, Goshwami analysed Tagore’s use of symbols in his plays including Tasher Desh, Achalayatan, Prakritir Pratishad, Raja, Phalguni, Muktadhara and Raktakarabi. Goshwami said, ‘These symbols easily communicate with the audience, since those are relevant to society.’
   Mentioning Raktokarobi as one of the most prominent symbolic plays by Tagore, Goshwami said, ‘Tagore used the spirit of womanhood as the symbol of the power of welfare. Nandini, the protagonist of Raktokarobi, succeeded in infusing that power in the self-aggrandize and plundering spirit of Makhar Raj, the King.’
   He further described Tagore’s thoughtful application of playing cards in the play Tasher Desh. ‘Tagore personified the inhabitants of the materialistic society who are guided by strict rules and disciplines, not by emotions, with playing cards. By the play, Tagore actually indicated the then British rule over India and inspired the people to fight against the rule.’
   Kabir Chowdhury said, ‘The use of symbols in the plays of Tagore is artistic and very relevant to the reality.’ The discussion session was followed by a musical programme in which leading Tagore singers Sadi Mohammad and Adity Mohsin enthralled the audiences with their solo performances.
   Sadi Mohammad rendered Tagore songs Samukhey shantir parabar and Emono dine tare bola jay. Adity Mohsin rendered two monsoon songs of Tagore such as Badol diner prothomo kadomo phul and Megher pore megh jomechhe.


Login to post comments


(0)



76th birth anniversary Remembering Zahir Raihan

Cultural Correspondent

Legendary Bangla filmmaker, litterateur and freedom fighter Zahir Raihan was born on August 5, 1935 at Majupur in Feni, according to his younger sister Shahenshah Begum, however, most of the documents related to his birth anniversary state that Raihan was born on August 19, 1935.
   If the family source is taken for granted, August 5, 2011 is the 76th anniversary of the birth of Zahir Raihan, whose original name was Zahirullah.
   However, there are still controversies about his biography- regarding his birth and death anniversary. More alarmingly, many of his films and documentaries, especially on the war of independence are either lost or damaged.
   An official of Bangladesh Film Archives said that they had five of Zahir Raihan’s films - ‘Kakhono Asheni’, ‘Kancher Deyal’, ‘Anwara, Behula’ and ‘Jiban Theke Neya’. The official also said they did not have Zahir Raihan’s others films such as ‘Bahana’, ‘Sangam’ and ‘Sonar Kajal’ and the unfinished documentary ‘Let There Be Light’ at their disposal. A communist by conviction, Zahir Raihan still stands as an icon of progressiveness for his direct involvement in the political movements and making films on those movements in middle of the last century that ultimately took momentum through the war of independence. His movies featuring such movements such as ‘Jiban Theke Neya’ and ‘Kancher Deyal’ are considered some of the very few classics in the history of our film industry.
   A winner of Bangla Academy Award for his novel Hajar Bachhar Dhorey, Zahir Raihan has written several acclaimed works such as ‘Shesh Bikeler Meye’, ‘Arek Falgun’, ‘Baraf Gola Nadi’ and ‘Aar Koto Din’. Zahir Raihan also made movies based on his literary works.
   As a conscious cultural activist, Raihan had remarkable contribution during the war of independence. He was the then general secretary of Bangladesh Liberation Council of Intelligentsia. During the war, Raihan made his most acclaimed documentary ‘Stop Genocide’ on the genocide done by the Pakistani military regime and its local collaborators. The documentary made him standing out as a film director in the country with his unique form and style. Many consider this film as one of the top 10 documentaries of its kind in the world.
   For his contribution to films, Zahir Raihan received many national awards including posthumous Ekushey Padak and Swadhinata Padak.
   Raihan’s younger sister Shahenshah Begum expressed her opinion that Zahir Raihan is not getting his due respect in Bangladesh. Bangladesh Film Development Corporation has no plan to observe Raihan’s birth anniversary.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent

Legendary Bangla filmmaker, litterateur and freedom fighter Zahir Raihan was born on August 5, 1935 at Majupur in Feni, according to his younger sister Shahenshah Begum, however, most of the documents related to his birth anniversary state that Raihan was born on August 19, 1935.
   If the family source is taken for granted, August 5, 2011 is the 76th anniversary of the birth of Zahir Raihan, whose original name was Zahirullah.
   However, there are still controversies about his biography- regarding his birth and death anniversary. More alarmingly, many of his films and documentaries, especially on the war of independence are either lost or damaged.
   An official of Bangladesh Film Archives said that they had five of Zahir Raihan’s films - ‘Kakhono Asheni’, ‘Kancher Deyal’, ‘Anwara, Behula’ and ‘Jiban Theke Neya’. The official also said they did not have Zahir Raihan’s others films such as ‘Bahana’, ‘Sangam’ and ‘Sonar Kajal’ and the unfinished documentary ‘Let There Be Light’ at their disposal. A communist by conviction, Zahir Raihan still stands as an icon of progressiveness for his direct involvement in the political movements and making films on those movements in middle of the last century that ultimately took momentum through the war of independence. His movies featuring such movements such as ‘Jiban Theke Neya’ and ‘Kancher Deyal’ are considered some of the very few classics in the history of our film industry.
   A winner of Bangla Academy Award for his novel Hajar Bachhar Dhorey, Zahir Raihan has written several acclaimed works such as ‘Shesh Bikeler Meye’, ‘Arek Falgun’, ‘Baraf Gola Nadi’ and ‘Aar Koto Din’. Zahir Raihan also made movies based on his literary works.
   As a conscious cultural activist, Raihan had remarkable contribution during the war of independence. He was the then general secretary of Bangladesh Liberation Council of Intelligentsia. During the war, Raihan made his most acclaimed documentary ‘Stop Genocide’ on the genocide done by the Pakistani military regime and its local collaborators. The documentary made him standing out as a film director in the country with his unique form and style. Many consider this film as one of the top 10 documentaries of its kind in the world.
   For his contribution to films, Zahir Raihan received many national awards including posthumous Ekushey Padak and Swadhinata Padak.
   Raihan’s younger sister Shahenshah Begum expressed her opinion that Zahir Raihan is not getting his due respect in Bangladesh. Bangladesh Film Development Corporation has no plan to observe Raihan’s birth anniversary.


Login to post comments


(0)



Sultan’s birth anniversary celebrated

Cultural Correspondent

The 88th birth anniversary of SM Sultan (1923-1994), who is ranked with the master artists of the world by many art critics, was celebrated on Wednesday. Sheikh Mohammed Sultan or commonly known as SM Sultan was born on this day in 1923 at Masimdia, a village in Narail district.
   The artiste’s life is as colourful and full of varieties as his paintings.
   Sultan’s deep urge of becoming an artist made him take an attempt to go Calcutta for higher studies on painting though only his artistic genius was not enough to go there as he did not have that financial capability. Therefore, the artist needed help, which he got from Zamindar (land lord) of the area, Dhirendranath Roy. After going to Calcutta, Sultan found that he did not have the requirements for admission into the Government School of Art thus he again needed help, and this time he got it from Shahid Suhrawardy, who was a member of the governing body of the School. Sultan entered the school. However, Sultan was born free and never wanted to work in walls, so he left the art school and started working as a freelance painter.
   Sultan, wondering from one region to another of the Indian sub-continent, was more a bohemian than a home sick man. Survival in remote regions of India would not have been very easy for any man. But Sultan was no ordinary man; he was a complete devotee and observer of the beauty of nature and the way of living of common people. Such men do not require many things to sustain.
   He held the first exhibition of his art work in Simla in 1946, but no work from this period survived, not even photographs as Sultan was totally indifferent to preserve his work.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent

The 88th birth anniversary of SM Sultan (1923-1994), who is ranked with the master artists of the world by many art critics, was celebrated on Wednesday. Sheikh Mohammed Sultan or commonly known as SM Sultan was born on this day in 1923 at Masimdia, a village in Narail district.
   The artiste’s life is as colourful and full of varieties as his paintings.
   Sultan’s deep urge of becoming an artist made him take an attempt to go Calcutta for higher studies on painting though only his artistic genius was not enough to go there as he did not have that financial capability. Therefore, the artist needed help, which he got from Zamindar (land lord) of the area, Dhirendranath Roy. After going to Calcutta, Sultan found that he did not have the requirements for admission into the Government School of Art thus he again needed help, and this time he got it from Shahid Suhrawardy, who was a member of the governing body of the School. Sultan entered the school. However, Sultan was born free and never wanted to work in walls, so he left the art school and started working as a freelance painter.
   Sultan, wondering from one region to another of the Indian sub-continent, was more a bohemian than a home sick man. Survival in remote regions of India would not have been very easy for any man. But Sultan was no ordinary man; he was a complete devotee and observer of the beauty of nature and the way of living of common people. Such men do not require many things to sustain.
   He held the first exhibition of his art work in Simla in 1946, but no work from this period survived, not even photographs as Sultan was totally indifferent to preserve his work.


Login to post comments


(0)



Lalon’s songs, philosophy highlighted

Cultural Correspondent

Bangla Academy paid tribute to mystic bard Fakir Lalon Shah on Monday at the seminer hall of the academy in a programme titled Man of the Heart featuring discussion and music.
   In the programme, Sudipto Chatterjee, who teaches in both English and Drama departments of Loughborough University, UK, rendered Lalon songs and presented Lalon’s philosophy through acting.
   Sudipto’s strong presence and rendition of Lalon songs bringing Lalon’s esoteric and sacrificial mood on the stage enthralled audience. Sudipto as a narrator also presented in-depth of Lalon’s song and philosophy.
   Sudipto Chatterjee got the idea of developing such production while visiting Lalon’s shrine in Kushtia in 1998 along with Indian filmmaker Suman Mukherjee, who is the director of the presentation.
   The production was first staged at the California University and then at various other cities including Chicago, New York, London, Mumbai and Kolkata and earned viewers’ acclaims.
   ‘When we two friends went to California for higher study in Drama in 2005, we prepared the production based on our experience from Lalon’s shrine in Kushtia ,’ said Sudipto from Kolkata, who was awarded the New York Drama Circle Award of Distinction for translation and direction of Nuraldeen’s Lifetime by Bangladeshi playwright Syed Shamsul Haq.
   The programme was anchored by folk researcher Saymon Zakaria while the live orchestra team included Nazrul Shah, Anowar Hossain and others.
   Bangla Academy director general Shamsuzzaman Khan delivered the welcome speech. Khan said ‘I heard about the production highlighting Lalon’s song, philosophy and the present condition of this music genre, which inspired us to arrange the programme in Dhaka.’

Comment

Cultural Correspondent

Bangla Academy paid tribute to mystic bard Fakir Lalon Shah on Monday at the seminer hall of the academy in a programme titled Man of the Heart featuring discussion and music.
   In the programme, Sudipto Chatterjee, who teaches in both English and Drama departments of Loughborough University, UK, rendered Lalon songs and presented Lalon’s philosophy through acting.
   Sudipto’s strong presence and rendition of Lalon songs bringing Lalon’s esoteric and sacrificial mood on the stage enthralled audience. Sudipto as a narrator also presented in-depth of Lalon’s song and philosophy.
   Sudipto Chatterjee got the idea of developing such production while visiting Lalon’s shrine in Kushtia in 1998 along with Indian filmmaker Suman Mukherjee, who is the director of the presentation.
   The production was first staged at the California University and then at various other cities including Chicago, New York, London, Mumbai and Kolkata and earned viewers’ acclaims.
   ‘When we two friends went to California for higher study in Drama in 2005, we prepared the production based on our experience from Lalon’s shrine in Kushtia ,’ said Sudipto from Kolkata, who was awarded the New York Drama Circle Award of Distinction for translation and direction of Nuraldeen’s Lifetime by Bangladeshi playwright Syed Shamsul Haq.
   The programme was anchored by folk researcher Saymon Zakaria while the live orchestra team included Nazrul Shah, Anowar Hossain and others.
   Bangla Academy director general Shamsuzzaman Khan delivered the welcome speech. Khan said ‘I heard about the production highlighting Lalon’s song, philosophy and the present condition of this music genre, which inspired us to arrange the programme in Dhaka.’


Login to post comments


(0)



BOOK REVIEW

Readings in Microfinance

 Microfinance is now globally recognised as a powerful intervention for alleviating poverty. This innovative development approach has inspired numerous research works around the world. The Institute of Microfinance (InM) has undertaken a project to compile the major publications on the experience of microfinance in Bangladesh into a series of readings, of which this is the first. Edited by S. R. Osmani and M. A. Baqui Khalily, the present anthology deals with the reach of Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) and their impacts on their clientele and the wider economy. This book is part of InM’s systematic effort to contribute to knowledge creation and management in the microfinance sector in Bangladesh and across the globe.
   S. R. Osmani is Professor of Development Economics at the University of Ulster, United Kingdom, and Visiting Scholar at the Institute of Microfinance.
   M. A. Baqui Khalily is Professor of Finance at the University of Dhaka.

Comment

 Microfinance is now globally recognised as a powerful intervention for alleviating poverty. This innovative development approach has inspired numerous research works around the world. The Institute of Microfinance (InM) has undertaken a project to compile the major publications on the experience of microfinance in Bangladesh into a series of readings, of which this is the first. Edited by S. R. Osmani and M. A. Baqui Khalily, the present anthology deals with the reach of Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) and their impacts on their clientele and the wider economy. This book is part of InM’s systematic effort to contribute to knowledge creation and management in the microfinance sector in Bangladesh and across the globe.
   S. R. Osmani is Professor of Development Economics at the University of Ulster, United Kingdom, and Visiting Scholar at the Institute of Microfinance.
   M. A. Baqui Khalily is Professor of Finance at the University of Dhaka.


Login to post comments


(0)



METROPOLITAN
EDITORIAL
COMMENTS
INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS
INFOTECH
CULTURE
AVIATOUR
SPECIAL HEADLINES
FOUNDING EDITOR: ENAYETULLAH KHAN; EDITOR: SAYED KAMALUDDIN
Contents Copyrighted © by Holiday Publication Limited
Mailing address 30, Tejgaon Industrial Area, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh.
Phone 880-2-8170462, 8170463, 8170464 Fax 880-2-9127927 Email weeklyholiday65@gmail.com
Site Managed By: Southtech Group
Southtech Group does not take any responsibility for any news content of this site