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Dallywood protest joint-venture films

Cultural Correspondent
 
Artistes, directors and technical staff of local film industry, known as Dhallywood, protested at the release of India-Bangladesh joint-venture film in the country by organising programmes on Sunday in front of Bangladesh Film Development Corporation and Bangladesh Film Censor Board.
They organised the programme to mount pressure on the censor board not to release two big-budget joint-venture films including Nawbab and Boss2, scheduled to get release in the upcoming Eid-ul-Fitr along with two local films Rajnity and Ahangkar.
Fourteen associations, led by Bangladesh Film Directors’ Association, organised a sit in programme in front of the BFDC at Tejgaon on Sunday morning and then marched towards the BFCB office at Eskaton.
In both of the sit in programmes, leaders of all these associations demanded not to issue censor certificates for both of the films starring the leading actors of Dhaka and Kolkata based film industries like Shakib Khan, Shabnam Bubli, Jit, Shubhasree, Nusrat Faria and others. 
Shakib Khan acted lead characters in Rajnity and Ahangkar opposite Opu Biswas and Shabnam Bubly respectively. Bangladesh Film Directors’ Association president Mushfiqur Rahman Gulzar, its general Badiul Alam Khokon, 
Bangladesh Film Artistes’ Association president Misha Soudagar, its general secretary Zayed Khan, eminent actors Farooque, Riaz, Anjona, Rubel, Emon, Poppy, Porimoni and others demanded ban on the release of joint-venture films as those do not follow the guidelines of Joint-Venture Film Policy-2012 by not appointing equal number of artistes and technical crew members from both countries thus many of the local artistes and technicians are losing jobs.
‘We are fed up with the producers of joint-venture films, who rigorously violate the guidelines of the policy. Now it is time to stand together against all the irregularities to protect the interest of the local industry,’ said Gulzar, adding that Indians were getting all the benefits of the joint-venture films. 
Seasoned actor Farooque said, ‘We have no other option but to protest at the release of the joint-venture films for our survival.’ ‘We will have to force the government to fulfill our demands since it’s the question of our survival,’ said Riaz. 
After the sit-in program in the FDC, the film’s artist, directors and craftsmen gheraoed the censor board office at Moghjbazar protesting the release of Boss 2 and Nobab Movie
During the mele, Iftekhar Uddin Nawsad, president of exhibition committee and owner of Madhumita Hall, was assaulted by the protewsters.
Leaders and activists of 16 film concerned organizations took place in front of the sensor board at 1:00 pm on Wednesday afternoon. Nawsad, who was already on the side of the joint productions ‘Boss 2’ and ‘Nawab’, was there.
Some activists of the film protecting movement came forward and attacked him. At that time Nowshad’s Punjabi was torn off. Later, the police took him to the censor board office.
At around 12:30 pm, the film makers took out a procession towards the sensor board from FDC.
At the time, they chanted slogan- ‘Chalachitrer dalalra hunshiyar Sabdhan,’ ‘Gherao Gherao Gherao Hobe, Sensor Board Gherao Hobe,’ ‘Joutha Projojona Chalbe Na.’
In the program, Misha Saudagar, Riaz, Simon, Badiul Alam Khokon, Tanin, Producer Samity leader Khorshed Alam Khasru and many others were present.
In question of the release of two India-Bangladesh joint-venture films, Boss-2 and Nabab, in the upcoming Eid-ul-Fitr, local film industry known as Dhallywood has sharply been divided into two groups and they are now at loggerheads.
Both of the groups are holding separate programmes: one group is demanding release of the films arguing that the big-budget films like Boss-2 and Nabab will help overcome slumped trade in the film industry by attracting many viewers at cinemas while the other group is protesting at the release of the films arguing that joint-venture films have given advantages to the Indian counterparts and have curtailed jobs of many local actors, directors and technical crew members.
Their programmes intensified on Wednesday when Bangladesh Film Censor Board organised censor shows of both of the films at its office in Eskaton. Fourteen associations of local film industry, including directors and actors, took position in front of the office to mount pressure on the board members not to issue censor certificates for the films. 
Bangladesh Film Exhibitors’ Association president Iftekhar Uddin Nawshad said, ‘The exhibitors, who paid in advance for booking of the films will have to count loss if those films do not get clearance from the government.’
Boss-2 stars Tollywood actor Jeet and Dhallywood actress Nusrat Faria, while Nabab features Dhallywood superstar Shakib Khan and Tollywood actress Shubhasree in the lead roles.
The censor board, however, have cleared both the films for exhibition. 
The India-Bangladesh joint-venture film production concept was introduced in 2012 following series of meetings of the Dhaka and Kolkata based film industries. Earlier, the local film industry sources said, Indians in association with the local exhibitors tried to import and exhibit Indian films. In response to their demands, the government in 2011 withdrew the ban, effective since 1965. But the decision made the local industry furious and they forced the government to reinstate the ban after five months. Under the South Asian Free Trade Area Agreement, Indian films get release in Bangladesh in exchange of exhibiting same number of local films in India. Information ministry sources said they would talk with the Dhallywood leaders, who were protesting at release of joint-venture films.Filmmaker Association, composed of 14 organizations in the film, has organized a protest rally in protest against what they said “joint fraud” in the name of join t film production.
Dhallywood has been protesting at commercial release of Indian films in Bangladesh since 2010.
Earlier in July last year, the Dallywood artistes, directors, and producers raised protest and formed a human chain in front of Bangladesh Film Development Corporation (BFDC) protesting at the move to allow the screening of Indian films in local film houses.
Bangladeshi film producer Sharif Hossain also filed a written petition challenging the legality of importing the film without following film importing and exporting rule. A HC bench stayed for six months the screening of Indian Bangla film ‘Kelor Kirti’, directed by Raja Chanda.
Later the Appellate Division cleared the way for screening the Indian film in the country staying the High Court Division. 

Comment

Cultural Correspondent
 
Artistes, directors and technical staff of local film industry, known as Dhallywood, protested at the release of India-Bangladesh joint-venture film in the country by organising programmes on Sunday in front of Bangladesh Film Development Corporation and Bangladesh Film Censor Board.
They organised the programme to mount pressure on the censor board not to release two big-budget joint-venture films including Nawbab and Boss2, scheduled to get release in the upcoming Eid-ul-Fitr along with two local films Rajnity and Ahangkar.
Fourteen associations, led by Bangladesh Film Directors’ Association, organised a sit in programme in front of the BFDC at Tejgaon on Sunday morning and then marched towards the BFCB office at Eskaton.
In both of the sit in programmes, leaders of all these associations demanded not to issue censor certificates for both of the films starring the leading actors of Dhaka and Kolkata based film industries like Shakib Khan, Shabnam Bubli, Jit, Shubhasree, Nusrat Faria and others. 
Shakib Khan acted lead characters in Rajnity and Ahangkar opposite Opu Biswas and Shabnam Bubly respectively. Bangladesh Film Directors’ Association president Mushfiqur Rahman Gulzar, its general Badiul Alam Khokon, 
Bangladesh Film Artistes’ Association president Misha Soudagar, its general secretary Zayed Khan, eminent actors Farooque, Riaz, Anjona, Rubel, Emon, Poppy, Porimoni and others demanded ban on the release of joint-venture films as those do not follow the guidelines of Joint-Venture Film Policy-2012 by not appointing equal number of artistes and technical crew members from both countries thus many of the local artistes and technicians are losing jobs.
‘We are fed up with the producers of joint-venture films, who rigorously violate the guidelines of the policy. Now it is time to stand together against all the irregularities to protect the interest of the local industry,’ said Gulzar, adding that Indians were getting all the benefits of the joint-venture films. 
Seasoned actor Farooque said, ‘We have no other option but to protest at the release of the joint-venture films for our survival.’ ‘We will have to force the government to fulfill our demands since it’s the question of our survival,’ said Riaz. 
After the sit-in program in the FDC, the film’s artist, directors and craftsmen gheraoed the censor board office at Moghjbazar protesting the release of Boss 2 and Nobab Movie
During the mele, Iftekhar Uddin Nawsad, president of exhibition committee and owner of Madhumita Hall, was assaulted by the protewsters.
Leaders and activists of 16 film concerned organizations took place in front of the sensor board at 1:00 pm on Wednesday afternoon. Nawsad, who was already on the side of the joint productions ‘Boss 2’ and ‘Nawab’, was there.
Some activists of the film protecting movement came forward and attacked him. At that time Nowshad’s Punjabi was torn off. Later, the police took him to the censor board office.
At around 12:30 pm, the film makers took out a procession towards the sensor board from FDC.
At the time, they chanted slogan- ‘Chalachitrer dalalra hunshiyar Sabdhan,’ ‘Gherao Gherao Gherao Hobe, Sensor Board Gherao Hobe,’ ‘Joutha Projojona Chalbe Na.’
In the program, Misha Saudagar, Riaz, Simon, Badiul Alam Khokon, Tanin, Producer Samity leader Khorshed Alam Khasru and many others were present.
In question of the release of two India-Bangladesh joint-venture films, Boss-2 and Nabab, in the upcoming Eid-ul-Fitr, local film industry known as Dhallywood has sharply been divided into two groups and they are now at loggerheads.
Both of the groups are holding separate programmes: one group is demanding release of the films arguing that the big-budget films like Boss-2 and Nabab will help overcome slumped trade in the film industry by attracting many viewers at cinemas while the other group is protesting at the release of the films arguing that joint-venture films have given advantages to the Indian counterparts and have curtailed jobs of many local actors, directors and technical crew members.
Their programmes intensified on Wednesday when Bangladesh Film Censor Board organised censor shows of both of the films at its office in Eskaton. Fourteen associations of local film industry, including directors and actors, took position in front of the office to mount pressure on the board members not to issue censor certificates for the films. 
Bangladesh Film Exhibitors’ Association president Iftekhar Uddin Nawshad said, ‘The exhibitors, who paid in advance for booking of the films will have to count loss if those films do not get clearance from the government.’
Boss-2 stars Tollywood actor Jeet and Dhallywood actress Nusrat Faria, while Nabab features Dhallywood superstar Shakib Khan and Tollywood actress Shubhasree in the lead roles.
The censor board, however, have cleared both the films for exhibition. 
The India-Bangladesh joint-venture film production concept was introduced in 2012 following series of meetings of the Dhaka and Kolkata based film industries. Earlier, the local film industry sources said, Indians in association with the local exhibitors tried to import and exhibit Indian films. In response to their demands, the government in 2011 withdrew the ban, effective since 1965. But the decision made the local industry furious and they forced the government to reinstate the ban after five months. Under the South Asian Free Trade Area Agreement, Indian films get release in Bangladesh in exchange of exhibiting same number of local films in India. Information ministry sources said they would talk with the Dhallywood leaders, who were protesting at release of joint-venture films.Filmmaker Association, composed of 14 organizations in the film, has organized a protest rally in protest against what they said “joint fraud” in the name of join t film production.
Dhallywood has been protesting at commercial release of Indian films in Bangladesh since 2010.
Earlier in July last year, the Dallywood artistes, directors, and producers raised protest and formed a human chain in front of Bangladesh Film Development Corporation (BFDC) protesting at the move to allow the screening of Indian films in local film houses.
Bangladeshi film producer Sharif Hossain also filed a written petition challenging the legality of importing the film without following film importing and exporting rule. A HC bench stayed for six months the screening of Indian Bangla film ‘Kelor Kirti’, directed by Raja Chanda.
Later the Appellate Division cleared the way for screening the Indian film in the country staying the High Court Division. 

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Bangladeshi actress’ turns Islamic preacher

Cultural Correspondent
 
Film actress Naznin Akter Happy who embroiled in scandal involving fast bowler Rubel Hossain three years ago has creatd a new sensation by converting herself into an ultra-conservative Islamic preacher.
The 22-year-old Happy has adopted the new name Amatullah- or the female servant of Allah now surfacing to preach a puritanical vision of Islam on social media.
Her book in Bangle language “Happy theke Amatullah” as release in June is already out of print and the publisher going for reprint in large number. “We’ve been swamped by orders for the book from all parts of the country,” said Mohammad Obaidullah, owner of Maktabatul Azhar, a publishing house specialising in Islamic books.
“Everyone wants to know what prompted her to quit the celebrity lifestyle for the ordinary life of a devout Muslim.”
Happy was a star in Dhallywood, the Bengali-language film industry, shooting to fame in her 2013 debut “Kichu Asha Kichu Valobasha” (Some Hopes, Some Loves).
But it was the controversy surrounding shock rape allegations she levelled against star fast bowler Rubel Hossain in late 2014 that made Happy a household name across cricket-mad Bangladesh.
Happy alleged she was involved in an “intimate affair” with the then 25-year-old cricketer, whom she accused of walking away from a promise of marriage.
The revelations proved scandalous in the Muslim-majority country, where sexual relationships outside marriage are frowned upon and allegations of coercion can be seen to restore honour.
Rubel claimed he was being blackmailed but was remanded in custody. He was released a few days later to play in the World Cup, and a court later found no evidence to convict him.
After so long in the public eye Happy’s sudden appearance in the black burka worn by only the most devout Bangladeshis fanned even greater curiosity about the young woman’s life.
Happy was weathering the Rubel scandal and part-way through shooting a new movie when the actress claims she had an “epiphany” that altered her life.
Overnight, she committed to joining Tablighi Jamaat—a Sunni Islam evangelical movement that boasts millions of adherents in Bangladesh—and began severing all ties to her past life.
“That night she started deleting thousands of photos of herself she posted on Facebook. She then cut ties with the movie world,” said Abdullah Al Faruque, who co-authored the book with his wife Sadeka Sultana Saqi, who was granted access to Happy for the interview.
“She renamed herself Amatullah. She started to wear a full-veiled burka and now even covers her hands and toes with socks.”
Happy turned her back on her fans and a stunned film industry to embrace the austerity of a missionary’s life, retreating to a madrassa to study the Koran where nobody would see “even the nails of my fingers”.
Determined to erase her past entirely and cement her pious makeover, Happy even fought unsuccessfully to stop the release of her final film “Real Man”, arguing it starred a completely different person.
“I felt like a newborn baby,” she wrote in the book, about the moment she donned the burka and abandoned her former name and identity.
“Now, I have no ties with my previous life. That’s the tale of a different person.”
The entire incident involving Rubel has been airbrushed from the book by the authors, who said they did not want to “embarrass” Happy, who is now married.
But even without these details the moral lessons implied—that Happy was seeking some sort of redemption in the scriptures—have resonated with Bangla readers.
“From Happy to Amatullah” is just the latest addition to a thriving genre of Islamist literature in Bangladesh, where authors have captivated readers weaving piety into plots lamenting modern women and Western lifestyles.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent
 
Film actress Naznin Akter Happy who embroiled in scandal involving fast bowler Rubel Hossain three years ago has creatd a new sensation by converting herself into an ultra-conservative Islamic preacher.
The 22-year-old Happy has adopted the new name Amatullah- or the female servant of Allah now surfacing to preach a puritanical vision of Islam on social media.
Her book in Bangle language “Happy theke Amatullah” as release in June is already out of print and the publisher going for reprint in large number. “We’ve been swamped by orders for the book from all parts of the country,” said Mohammad Obaidullah, owner of Maktabatul Azhar, a publishing house specialising in Islamic books.
“Everyone wants to know what prompted her to quit the celebrity lifestyle for the ordinary life of a devout Muslim.”
Happy was a star in Dhallywood, the Bengali-language film industry, shooting to fame in her 2013 debut “Kichu Asha Kichu Valobasha” (Some Hopes, Some Loves).
But it was the controversy surrounding shock rape allegations she levelled against star fast bowler Rubel Hossain in late 2014 that made Happy a household name across cricket-mad Bangladesh.
Happy alleged she was involved in an “intimate affair” with the then 25-year-old cricketer, whom she accused of walking away from a promise of marriage.
The revelations proved scandalous in the Muslim-majority country, where sexual relationships outside marriage are frowned upon and allegations of coercion can be seen to restore honour.
Rubel claimed he was being blackmailed but was remanded in custody. He was released a few days later to play in the World Cup, and a court later found no evidence to convict him.
After so long in the public eye Happy’s sudden appearance in the black burka worn by only the most devout Bangladeshis fanned even greater curiosity about the young woman’s life.
Happy was weathering the Rubel scandal and part-way through shooting a new movie when the actress claims she had an “epiphany” that altered her life.
Overnight, she committed to joining Tablighi Jamaat—a Sunni Islam evangelical movement that boasts millions of adherents in Bangladesh—and began severing all ties to her past life.
“That night she started deleting thousands of photos of herself she posted on Facebook. She then cut ties with the movie world,” said Abdullah Al Faruque, who co-authored the book with his wife Sadeka Sultana Saqi, who was granted access to Happy for the interview.
“She renamed herself Amatullah. She started to wear a full-veiled burka and now even covers her hands and toes with socks.”
Happy turned her back on her fans and a stunned film industry to embrace the austerity of a missionary’s life, retreating to a madrassa to study the Koran where nobody would see “even the nails of my fingers”.
Determined to erase her past entirely and cement her pious makeover, Happy even fought unsuccessfully to stop the release of her final film “Real Man”, arguing it starred a completely different person.
“I felt like a newborn baby,” she wrote in the book, about the moment she donned the burka and abandoned her former name and identity.
“Now, I have no ties with my previous life. That’s the tale of a different person.”
The entire incident involving Rubel has been airbrushed from the book by the authors, who said they did not want to “embarrass” Happy, who is now married.
But even without these details the moral lessons implied—that Happy was seeking some sort of redemption in the scriptures—have resonated with Bangla readers.
“From Happy to Amatullah” is just the latest addition to a thriving genre of Islamist literature in Bangladesh, where authors have captivated readers weaving piety into plots lamenting modern women and Western lifestyles.

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Sufia Kamal’s anniversary of birthday celebrated

Cultural Correspondent
 

Artistes present a song at the commemorative programme celebrating Sufia Kamal’s birth anniversary at Bangla Academy on Tuesday
Poet-activist-organiser Sufia Kamal’s 106th anniversary of birthday was celebrated at Abdul Karim Sahitya Bisharad Auditorium of Bangla Academy on Tuesday.
Bangladesh Mahila Parishad, one of the many organisations for women’s welfare founded by Sufia Kamal, organised the programme which included handing over of Sufia Kamal Memorial Award, Sufia Kamal Memorial lecture and cultural show.
Bangladesh Under-16 national women’s football team and three women were given the Sufia Kamal Memorial Award for their contributions to their respective fields.
Shabana Akter received the award for her courageous and successful initiatives in stopping child marriage, Arati Rani Biswas received the award for her success in fish farming and Motahera Nasrin received the award for being a successful farmer.
‘Women are keeping pace with their male counterparts in diverse fields. Bangladesh Mahila Parishad encourages women to pursue different professions and become successful on their own merits. The recipients, this year, are some of the women who have proved their capabilities in diverse fields’, Maleka Banu, general secretary of Bangladesh Mahila Parishad.
Vice-chancellor of Premier University professor Anupam Sen presented Sufia Kamal Memorial Lecture on the occasion.
He read out the paper titled ‘Muktijuddher Osampradayik Chetona Ebong Shiksha O Sufia Kamal, which highlighted Sufia Kamal’s lifelong efforts to spread secular and democratic thinking in the society.
‘A poet, social reformer and organiser, Sufia Kamal herself was guided by the secular-humanitarian spirit of the liberation war and sought to spread that spirit. A culturally-oriented Sufia Kamal always stood against injustice and extremism’, said Anupam Sen.
The cultural show commenced with a chorus rendition of Rajanikanta San’s devotional song Tumi Nirmalo Koro by artistes of Rokeya Sadan, a cultural wing of Bangladesh Mahila Parishad.
Seasoned singers Susmita Ahmed and Iffat Ara Dewan next entertained the audience with solo performances of Rabindra Sangeet at the programme.
Susmita Ahmed sang popular Tagore songs Tai Tomar Ananda and Badal Diner Prothom Kadom Phul, while Iffat Ara Dewan rendered Money Ki Dwidha Rekhe Gele and Aji Tomay Abar Chai Shonabare on the occasion.
An influential cultural figure in the Bengali nationalist movements of the 1950s and 60s and a civil society leader in the country after independence, Sufia Kamal was born on June 20, 1911 in a conservative Muslim family in Barisal. A pioneer of Bengali women’s emancipation Sufia Kamal passed away on November 20, 1999.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent
 

Artistes present a song at the commemorative programme celebrating Sufia Kamal’s birth anniversary at Bangla Academy on Tuesday
Poet-activist-organiser Sufia Kamal’s 106th anniversary of birthday was celebrated at Abdul Karim Sahitya Bisharad Auditorium of Bangla Academy on Tuesday.
Bangladesh Mahila Parishad, one of the many organisations for women’s welfare founded by Sufia Kamal, organised the programme which included handing over of Sufia Kamal Memorial Award, Sufia Kamal Memorial lecture and cultural show.
Bangladesh Under-16 national women’s football team and three women were given the Sufia Kamal Memorial Award for their contributions to their respective fields.
Shabana Akter received the award for her courageous and successful initiatives in stopping child marriage, Arati Rani Biswas received the award for her success in fish farming and Motahera Nasrin received the award for being a successful farmer.
‘Women are keeping pace with their male counterparts in diverse fields. Bangladesh Mahila Parishad encourages women to pursue different professions and become successful on their own merits. The recipients, this year, are some of the women who have proved their capabilities in diverse fields’, Maleka Banu, general secretary of Bangladesh Mahila Parishad.
Vice-chancellor of Premier University professor Anupam Sen presented Sufia Kamal Memorial Lecture on the occasion.
He read out the paper titled ‘Muktijuddher Osampradayik Chetona Ebong Shiksha O Sufia Kamal, which highlighted Sufia Kamal’s lifelong efforts to spread secular and democratic thinking in the society.
‘A poet, social reformer and organiser, Sufia Kamal herself was guided by the secular-humanitarian spirit of the liberation war and sought to spread that spirit. A culturally-oriented Sufia Kamal always stood against injustice and extremism’, said Anupam Sen.
The cultural show commenced with a chorus rendition of Rajanikanta San’s devotional song Tumi Nirmalo Koro by artistes of Rokeya Sadan, a cultural wing of Bangladesh Mahila Parishad.
Seasoned singers Susmita Ahmed and Iffat Ara Dewan next entertained the audience with solo performances of Rabindra Sangeet at the programme.
Susmita Ahmed sang popular Tagore songs Tai Tomar Ananda and Badal Diner Prothom Kadom Phul, while Iffat Ara Dewan rendered Money Ki Dwidha Rekhe Gele and Aji Tomay Abar Chai Shonabare on the occasion.
An influential cultural figure in the Bengali nationalist movements of the 1950s and 60s and a civil society leader in the country after independence, Sufia Kamal was born on June 20, 1911 in a conservative Muslim family in Barisal. A pioneer of Bengali women’s emancipation Sufia Kamal passed away on November 20, 1999.

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