Friday, October 13, 2017 CULTURE

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Role of cultural resources for sustainable development

Alamgir Khan

As a nation Banaglis are culturally very rich. Music and poetry runs through our blood. Jatra is our distinct way of theatre practice. Our country is blessed with the invaluable natural resources such as sun, air, water and soil as well as cultural resources inherited  over  the4 generations  by our common people.
Boatmen, shepherds, peasants all sing songs while engaged   in work and passing  idle  time without work. Our cinema, therefore, from  the  beginning  based  their  stories  blended with  songs and dance and  music to  entertainment the viewers. Besides these, traditional sports like danguli, gollachhut, dariabandha, etc. are many in Bnagladesh leaving aside football and cricket. But unfortunately, with the days going by we are losing our cultural resources due to our lack of patronisation. Nowadays, it is becoming more and more evident that cultural resources are no less important than mineral and other material things.
We have been on the highway of development for the past several years in terms of GDP. Yet, lives of people are not free of pains and struggles. While GDP is increasing, qualities of education, health, water, environment, foods, personal freedom, and other essential things of life are on decline. This is not a case happening in only  this country, . Peoples of many other countries are facing similar problems. In many places in today’s world, therefore, people have gathered on the streets to protest against depletion of their resources. Along with this, there are rising concerns for the protection of people’s cultural resources.
Development at the expense of cultural resources adds little to the wellbeing of social life. Simply speaking, if we only become rich but forget to sing and recite, fail to express our sorrows and joys in a social way, forget to be concerned about our future generation, cannot feel pleasure in helping others who are disadvantaged and in trouble, and so on, this is not development in a true sense. For this reason, Nobel economist Amartya Sen writes, “Cultural matters are integral parts of the lives we lead. If development can be seen as enhancement of our living standards, then efforts geared to development can hardly ignore the world of culture.”
A Unesco paper, ‘Culture: a driver and an enabler of sustainable development’, reflects, “Throughout the past decade, statistics, indicators and data on the cultural sector, as well as operational activities have underscored that culture can be a powerful driver for development, with community-wide social, economic and environmental impacts. Of particular relevance is the cultural sector’s contribution to the economy and poverty alleviation. Cultural heritage, cultural and creative industries, sustainable cultural tourism, and cultural infrastructure can serve as strategic tools for revenue generation, particularly in developing countries given their often-rich cultural heritage and substantial labour force.”
If CEOs of our development programmes cannot look at their achievements in a cultural perspective, they will end up with a very wrong perception. Development will turn futile if it destroys people’s cultural resources. In our country now, playgrounds are diminishing, cinema halls vanishing, jatra disappearing, tarditional sports going into oblivion, and there are many other ways of destruction of our valuable cultural resources. There must be a massive plan and action to recover our people from falling into the desert of un-culture.  
Cultural activities is the lifeblood of a nation. A nation is not only a collection  of  individual men and women, more in a collective way. It is people who exist not only physically but also express themselves through cultural activities that include their language, dress, food habit, publication of books, reading habit, poetry, music, dance, theatre, festivity and attitude to their history of struggles and so many other things. If a nation has lacking in any of these and other cultural fields, it is likely  to  a malnourished individual.
Jyoti Hosagrahar, Director of the Division of Creativity at UNESCO, therefore, wrote (Culture: at the heart of SDGs), “If the SDGs are grouped around the economic, social, and environmental objectives as the three pillars of sustainable development, then culture and creativity contribute to each of these pillars transversally. The economic, social, and environmental dimensions of sustainable development, in turn, contribute to the safeguarding of cultural heritage and nurturing creativity.
“Cultural heritage - both tangible and intangible - and creativity are resources that need to be protected and carefully managed. They can serve both as drivers for achieving the SDGs as well as enablers, when culture-forward solutions can ensure the success of interventions to achieve the SDGs.”
If we don’t want partial development, but the whole of it, we must put our attention to protection and improvement of cultural resources. If we want success in SDGs as we partly accomplished in the case of MDGs, we must not ignore and waste away the cultural potential our ordinary people have inherited and own in their genes. Now is the time to have a national level initiative for improvement of our cultural resources and thus to make development truly meaningful.

Comment

Alamgir Khan

As a nation Banaglis are culturally very rich. Music and poetry runs through our blood. Jatra is our distinct way of theatre practice. Our country is blessed with the invaluable natural resources such as sun, air, water and soil as well as cultural resources inherited  over  the4 generations  by our common people.
Boatmen, shepherds, peasants all sing songs while engaged   in work and passing  idle  time without work. Our cinema, therefore, from  the  beginning  based  their  stories  blended with  songs and dance and  music to  entertainment the viewers. Besides these, traditional sports like danguli, gollachhut, dariabandha, etc. are many in Bnagladesh leaving aside football and cricket. But unfortunately, with the days going by we are losing our cultural resources due to our lack of patronisation. Nowadays, it is becoming more and more evident that cultural resources are no less important than mineral and other material things.
We have been on the highway of development for the past several years in terms of GDP. Yet, lives of people are not free of pains and struggles. While GDP is increasing, qualities of education, health, water, environment, foods, personal freedom, and other essential things of life are on decline. This is not a case happening in only  this country, . Peoples of many other countries are facing similar problems. In many places in today’s world, therefore, people have gathered on the streets to protest against depletion of their resources. Along with this, there are rising concerns for the protection of people’s cultural resources.
Development at the expense of cultural resources adds little to the wellbeing of social life. Simply speaking, if we only become rich but forget to sing and recite, fail to express our sorrows and joys in a social way, forget to be concerned about our future generation, cannot feel pleasure in helping others who are disadvantaged and in trouble, and so on, this is not development in a true sense. For this reason, Nobel economist Amartya Sen writes, “Cultural matters are integral parts of the lives we lead. If development can be seen as enhancement of our living standards, then efforts geared to development can hardly ignore the world of culture.”
A Unesco paper, ‘Culture: a driver and an enabler of sustainable development’, reflects, “Throughout the past decade, statistics, indicators and data on the cultural sector, as well as operational activities have underscored that culture can be a powerful driver for development, with community-wide social, economic and environmental impacts. Of particular relevance is the cultural sector’s contribution to the economy and poverty alleviation. Cultural heritage, cultural and creative industries, sustainable cultural tourism, and cultural infrastructure can serve as strategic tools for revenue generation, particularly in developing countries given their often-rich cultural heritage and substantial labour force.”
If CEOs of our development programmes cannot look at their achievements in a cultural perspective, they will end up with a very wrong perception. Development will turn futile if it destroys people’s cultural resources. In our country now, playgrounds are diminishing, cinema halls vanishing, jatra disappearing, tarditional sports going into oblivion, and there are many other ways of destruction of our valuable cultural resources. There must be a massive plan and action to recover our people from falling into the desert of un-culture.  
Cultural activities is the lifeblood of a nation. A nation is not only a collection  of  individual men and women, more in a collective way. It is people who exist not only physically but also express themselves through cultural activities that include their language, dress, food habit, publication of books, reading habit, poetry, music, dance, theatre, festivity and attitude to their history of struggles and so many other things. If a nation has lacking in any of these and other cultural fields, it is likely  to  a malnourished individual.
Jyoti Hosagrahar, Director of the Division of Creativity at UNESCO, therefore, wrote (Culture: at the heart of SDGs), “If the SDGs are grouped around the economic, social, and environmental objectives as the three pillars of sustainable development, then culture and creativity contribute to each of these pillars transversally. The economic, social, and environmental dimensions of sustainable development, in turn, contribute to the safeguarding of cultural heritage and nurturing creativity.
“Cultural heritage - both tangible and intangible - and creativity are resources that need to be protected and carefully managed. They can serve both as drivers for achieving the SDGs as well as enablers, when culture-forward solutions can ensure the success of interventions to achieve the SDGs.”
If we don’t want partial development, but the whole of it, we must put our attention to protection and improvement of cultural resources. If we want success in SDGs as we partly accomplished in the case of MDGs, we must not ignore and waste away the cultural potential our ordinary people have inherited and own in their genes. Now is the time to have a national level initiative for improvement of our cultural resources and thus to make development truly meaningful.


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Kanka O Lila staged at Public Library auditorium

Cultural Correspondent

The classic Bangla folk tale of Kanka O Lila (Kanka and Lila) from Mymensingh Geetika was brought  to  the stage  the Showkat Osman Memorial Auditoriam of Public Library in Shahbagh on Friday.
Recitation group    Kanthashilon made  the revival  l of this classic  tale  as originally written by four muses of classic Bangla folk literature- Damodar Das, Raghusutha, Shreenath Benia and Nayanchand Ghosh
Kanka O Lila revolves around the story of two star-crossed lovers- Kanka, a novice in a monastery who falls in love with his muse’s daughter, Lila. Their romantic entanglement ultimately becomes doomed under the social rules and norms. It speaks of a universal struggle, one that can be found in abundance to this day.
The stage was decorated in accordance with the classic theme which included Hurricane lanterns and greeneries in the background. The artists were also in traditional folk costumes. The hour long production’s music was directed by Monami Islam Kanak. Director of choreography was Jahangir Alam Rony. Stage designer, costume designer and production head was Mostafa Kamal, Ila Rahman and Ibrahim Khalil Palash respectively.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent

The classic Bangla folk tale of Kanka O Lila (Kanka and Lila) from Mymensingh Geetika was brought  to  the stage  the Showkat Osman Memorial Auditoriam of Public Library in Shahbagh on Friday.
Recitation group    Kanthashilon made  the revival  l of this classic  tale  as originally written by four muses of classic Bangla folk literature- Damodar Das, Raghusutha, Shreenath Benia and Nayanchand Ghosh
Kanka O Lila revolves around the story of two star-crossed lovers- Kanka, a novice in a monastery who falls in love with his muse’s daughter, Lila. Their romantic entanglement ultimately becomes doomed under the social rules and norms. It speaks of a universal struggle, one that can be found in abundance to this day.
The stage was decorated in accordance with the classic theme which included Hurricane lanterns and greeneries in the background. The artists were also in traditional folk costumes. The hour long production’s music was directed by Monami Islam Kanak. Director of choreography was Jahangir Alam Rony. Stage designer, costume designer and production head was Mostafa Kamal, Ila Rahman and Ibrahim Khalil Palash respectively.


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Debshankar entertains Dhaka audience

Cultural Correspondent

Debshankar Haldar perfroms in Barno Porichoy on Sunday

Kolkata-based Indian theatre artiste Debshankar Haldar entertained the Dhaka audience by presenting a monodrama at the Experimental Theatre Hall of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy on Sunday.
The play titled ‘Barnoporichoy’ was staged on the third day of the ongoing Ganga Jamuna Theatre Festival, which has been organised by Ganga-Jamuna Natyautsab Parshad.
Written and directed by Rajrendra Mukhopadhyay, the play depicts everyday life and struggles of the people who belong to the aristocratic families of South Kolkata, India.
Debshankar played different members of a Ray Chowdhury family of Kolkata. He changed his costumes a number of times during his performance.
With his spontaneous and comic performance Debshankar made the people laugh.
‘I am a great fan of Debshankar Haldar so I could not miss his performance in Dhaka. And he hasn’t disappointed me at all. I enjoyed his performance greatly,’ Somita Sharmin, a student of Dhaka University, said.
About his visit to Bangladesh, Debshankar Haldar told the press that he had performed in
Dhaka before and he looks forward to perform in Dhaka again.
‘Bangladeshi audience is very passionate about theatre. The cultural similarity between Bangladesh and West Bengal, India always inspires me to come to Dhaka and perform,’ said Debshankar.
Debshankar Haldar has a long career in Bengali theatre groups such as Nandikar, Rangapat, Natyaranga, Sudrak, Gandhar, Bratyajon, Sansriti and Blank Verse. Known for his versatility, he played the role of Debabrata Biswas in ‘Bratyajon’’s production ‘Ruddha Sangeet’, Swami Vivekananda in Lokkrishti’s Biley and the historical theatrical figure Sisir Kumar Bhaduri in Indraranga’s Nisshanga Samrat. Debshankar has also worked in films.
Debshankar Haldar was born in Kolkata. His father Abhay Haldar was an actor of Bengali Jatra and his brother Amiya Haldar is an actor in the Bengali theatre group Bohurupee. He graduated from the Scottish Church College at the University of Calcutta.[3] He credits his father for his introduction to the theatre world. In 1986 Haldar joined a workshop organized by Nandikar with the intention of learning acting. The workshop was so engrossing that he decided not to look beyond theatre. Over the years he has been keenly involved with every aspect of theatre. One of the leading trainers of the group and closely associated with Nandikar’s Children’s Ensemble he has written and directed over 40 children’s plays including the much acclaimed ‘Bhalo Manush Noigo Mora’. His first directorial venture outside Nandikar is Story Teller’s ‘Topi’.
In April 2010 Rangapat held a theatre festival to showcase the works of actor Debshankar Haldar,  a feat which no other stage actor from Bengal has achieved, not even the greats like Sisir Bhaduri, Sombhu Mitra or Utpal Dutta.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent

Debshankar Haldar perfroms in Barno Porichoy on Sunday

Kolkata-based Indian theatre artiste Debshankar Haldar entertained the Dhaka audience by presenting a monodrama at the Experimental Theatre Hall of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy on Sunday.
The play titled ‘Barnoporichoy’ was staged on the third day of the ongoing Ganga Jamuna Theatre Festival, which has been organised by Ganga-Jamuna Natyautsab Parshad.
Written and directed by Rajrendra Mukhopadhyay, the play depicts everyday life and struggles of the people who belong to the aristocratic families of South Kolkata, India.
Debshankar played different members of a Ray Chowdhury family of Kolkata. He changed his costumes a number of times during his performance.
With his spontaneous and comic performance Debshankar made the people laugh.
‘I am a great fan of Debshankar Haldar so I could not miss his performance in Dhaka. And he hasn’t disappointed me at all. I enjoyed his performance greatly,’ Somita Sharmin, a student of Dhaka University, said.
About his visit to Bangladesh, Debshankar Haldar told the press that he had performed in
Dhaka before and he looks forward to perform in Dhaka again.
‘Bangladeshi audience is very passionate about theatre. The cultural similarity between Bangladesh and West Bengal, India always inspires me to come to Dhaka and perform,’ said Debshankar.
Debshankar Haldar has a long career in Bengali theatre groups such as Nandikar, Rangapat, Natyaranga, Sudrak, Gandhar, Bratyajon, Sansriti and Blank Verse. Known for his versatility, he played the role of Debabrata Biswas in ‘Bratyajon’’s production ‘Ruddha Sangeet’, Swami Vivekananda in Lokkrishti’s Biley and the historical theatrical figure Sisir Kumar Bhaduri in Indraranga’s Nisshanga Samrat. Debshankar has also worked in films.
Debshankar Haldar was born in Kolkata. His father Abhay Haldar was an actor of Bengali Jatra and his brother Amiya Haldar is an actor in the Bengali theatre group Bohurupee. He graduated from the Scottish Church College at the University of Calcutta.[3] He credits his father for his introduction to the theatre world. In 1986 Haldar joined a workshop organized by Nandikar with the intention of learning acting. The workshop was so engrossing that he decided not to look beyond theatre. Over the years he has been keenly involved with every aspect of theatre. One of the leading trainers of the group and closely associated with Nandikar’s Children’s Ensemble he has written and directed over 40 children’s plays including the much acclaimed ‘Bhalo Manush Noigo Mora’. His first directorial venture outside Nandikar is Story Teller’s ‘Topi’.
In April 2010 Rangapat held a theatre festival to showcase the works of actor Debshankar Haldar,  a feat which no other stage actor from Bengal has achieved, not even the greats like Sisir Bhaduri, Sombhu Mitra or Utpal Dutta.


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Belarussian student becomes first-ever Miss Wheelchair World

Cultural Correspondent

A psychology student from Belarus, Aleksandra Chichikova, was chosen Miss Wheelchair World in the first-ever edition of the beauty pageant held in Warsaw last week.
“Fight your anxiety and your fears,” the 23-year-old Chichikova said at a gala evening, after the contestants had presented themselves in national costumes and evening dresses in elaborate choreographies.
Lebohang Monyatsi from South Africa was the runner-up ahead of Poland’s Adrianna Zawadzinska in the first contest of its kind on a global scale, which brought together 24 young women from 19 countries.
The goal of the contest was to “change the image of women in wheelchairs so they would not be judged solely by this attribute,” contest co-founder and jury president Katarzyna Wojtaszek-Ginalska told AFP
The pageant organised by the Poland-based Only One Foundation also seeks to show that a wheelchair is a luxury in many parts of the world, she added.
The contestants were chosen either in national rounds or, in countries with no such pageants, by non-governmental organisations addressed by the Polish foundation.
“It is not the looks that matter the most,” said Wojtaszek-Ginalska, who is also confined to a wheelchair.
“Of course, a good look counts but we have focused especially on the personality of the girls, their everyday activities, their involvement, social life, plans,” she added.
The contestants spent eight days in the Polish capital, busy with rehearsals, photo sessions, conferences and visits.
The inaugural Miss Wheelchair World attracted contestants from Angola, Belarus, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Finland, France, Guatemala, India, Italy, Mexico, Moldova, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, South Africa, Ukraine and the United States.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent

A psychology student from Belarus, Aleksandra Chichikova, was chosen Miss Wheelchair World in the first-ever edition of the beauty pageant held in Warsaw last week.
“Fight your anxiety and your fears,” the 23-year-old Chichikova said at a gala evening, after the contestants had presented themselves in national costumes and evening dresses in elaborate choreographies.
Lebohang Monyatsi from South Africa was the runner-up ahead of Poland’s Adrianna Zawadzinska in the first contest of its kind on a global scale, which brought together 24 young women from 19 countries.
The goal of the contest was to “change the image of women in wheelchairs so they would not be judged solely by this attribute,” contest co-founder and jury president Katarzyna Wojtaszek-Ginalska told AFP
The pageant organised by the Poland-based Only One Foundation also seeks to show that a wheelchair is a luxury in many parts of the world, she added.
The contestants were chosen either in national rounds or, in countries with no such pageants, by non-governmental organisations addressed by the Polish foundation.
“It is not the looks that matter the most,” said Wojtaszek-Ginalska, who is also confined to a wheelchair.
“Of course, a good look counts but we have focused especially on the personality of the girls, their everyday activities, their involvement, social life, plans,” she added.
The contestants spent eight days in the Polish capital, busy with rehearsals, photo sessions, conferences and visits.
The inaugural Miss Wheelchair World attracted contestants from Angola, Belarus, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Finland, France, Guatemala, India, Italy, Mexico, Moldova, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, South Africa, Ukraine and the United States.


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Hollywood producer fired on sex harassment report

Cultural Correspondent

Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein was fired from his film studio The Weinstein Company on Sunday following reports that he sexually harassed women over several decades.
“In light of new information about misconduct by Harvey Weinstein that has emerged in the past few days, the directors of The Weinstein Company... have determined, and have informed Harvey Weinstein, that his employment with The Weinstein Company is terminated, effective immediately,” the company’s board said in a statement quoted by US media.
The firing came after The New York Times published a bombshell report earlier this week that alleged Weinstein, whose company produced such hits as “The King’s Speech” and “The Artist”, preyed on young women hoping to break into the film industry.
The accusers—reportedly including celebrities such as Rose McGowan and Ashley Judd—say Weinstein promised to help advance their careers in exchange for sexual favors and pressured them to massage him and watch him naked.
Republicans have pounced on the scandal because Weinstein has been a major backer of Democratic candidates. Many Democratic lawmakers have since vowed to give their contributions from Weinstein to charity.
President Donald Trump, who said he had known Weinstein for a “very long time”, said he was “not at all surprised” by the revelations.
Trump faced his own sex scandal last year when video emerged of him using lewd language to describe groping women.
Hollywood powerhouse fades - Many in the entertainment industry have spoken out in the wake of the allegations, expressing support for the alleged victims.
“The women who chose to speak about their experience of harassment by Harvey Weinstein deserve our awe,” actress and self-proclaimed feminist Lena Dunham said. “It’s not fun or easy, it’s brave.”
Five of the company’s nine all-male board members have resigned over the scandal. The remaining members are Robert Weinstein, Lance Maerov, Richard Koenigsberg and Tarak Ben Ammar.
It was not immediately clear what would happen to the share Weinstein owns in the company.
In a statement, Weinstein—a staunch Democratic campaign fundraiser who backed Hillary Clinton in her presidential bid—said he respected all women and was hoping for a second chance while acknowledging he had “work to do to earn it.”
A father-of-two married to British fashion designer Georgina Chapman, Weinstein is considered a powerhouse in Hollywood and many of his movies have picked up Oscars over the years, including “Good Will Hunting” and “The Artist”.
He formed the Miramax production house in the late 1970s with his brother and then sold it to Disney. The pair went on to create the highly successful Weinstein Company.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent

Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein was fired from his film studio The Weinstein Company on Sunday following reports that he sexually harassed women over several decades.
“In light of new information about misconduct by Harvey Weinstein that has emerged in the past few days, the directors of The Weinstein Company... have determined, and have informed Harvey Weinstein, that his employment with The Weinstein Company is terminated, effective immediately,” the company’s board said in a statement quoted by US media.
The firing came after The New York Times published a bombshell report earlier this week that alleged Weinstein, whose company produced such hits as “The King’s Speech” and “The Artist”, preyed on young women hoping to break into the film industry.
The accusers—reportedly including celebrities such as Rose McGowan and Ashley Judd—say Weinstein promised to help advance their careers in exchange for sexual favors and pressured them to massage him and watch him naked.
Republicans have pounced on the scandal because Weinstein has been a major backer of Democratic candidates. Many Democratic lawmakers have since vowed to give their contributions from Weinstein to charity.
President Donald Trump, who said he had known Weinstein for a “very long time”, said he was “not at all surprised” by the revelations.
Trump faced his own sex scandal last year when video emerged of him using lewd language to describe groping women.
Hollywood powerhouse fades - Many in the entertainment industry have spoken out in the wake of the allegations, expressing support for the alleged victims.
“The women who chose to speak about their experience of harassment by Harvey Weinstein deserve our awe,” actress and self-proclaimed feminist Lena Dunham said. “It’s not fun or easy, it’s brave.”
Five of the company’s nine all-male board members have resigned over the scandal. The remaining members are Robert Weinstein, Lance Maerov, Richard Koenigsberg and Tarak Ben Ammar.
It was not immediately clear what would happen to the share Weinstein owns in the company.
In a statement, Weinstein—a staunch Democratic campaign fundraiser who backed Hillary Clinton in her presidential bid—said he respected all women and was hoping for a second chance while acknowledging he had “work to do to earn it.”
A father-of-two married to British fashion designer Georgina Chapman, Weinstein is considered a powerhouse in Hollywood and many of his movies have picked up Oscars over the years, including “Good Will Hunting” and “The Artist”.
He formed the Miramax production house in the late 1970s with his brother and then sold it to Disney. The pair went on to create the highly successful Weinstein Company.


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Rapper Nelly released after sexual assault allegation

Cultural Correspondent

US rap singer Nelly Nelly has been booked and released without being charged following his rape arrest in Auburn, Washington last week.
Auburn police spokesman Commander Steve Stocker confirmed to Nelly, whose real name is Cornell Iral Haynes Jr., was booked Saturday morning after being arrested at about 4:37 a.m. in his tour bus at a Walmart.
Saturday’s scheduled tour in Ridgefield, Wash., where he was due to play a show with country duo Florida Georgia Line was suspended due to the trouble.
According to the jail’s inmate database, he was arrested on suspicion of second-degree rape, indicating force was used or the victim was incapable of consent due to being physically helpless, mentally incapacitated or developmentally disabled.
Nelly’s attorney Scott Rosenblum said, “Nelly is the victim of a completely fabricated allegation. Our initial investigation clearly establishes this allegation is devoid of credibility and is motivated by greed and vindictiveness. I am confident, once this scurrilous accusation is thoroughly investigated, there will be no charges. Nelly is prepared to address and pursue all legal avenues to redress any damage caused by this clearly false allegation.”
Nelly, 42, is a three-time Grammy winner, including for the song Hot in Herre, which won the best male rap solo performance award in 2002.
The following year, he shared a Grammy for the song Shake Ya Tailfeather with Murphy Lee and Sean Combs.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent

US rap singer Nelly Nelly has been booked and released without being charged following his rape arrest in Auburn, Washington last week.
Auburn police spokesman Commander Steve Stocker confirmed to Nelly, whose real name is Cornell Iral Haynes Jr., was booked Saturday morning after being arrested at about 4:37 a.m. in his tour bus at a Walmart.
Saturday’s scheduled tour in Ridgefield, Wash., where he was due to play a show with country duo Florida Georgia Line was suspended due to the trouble.
According to the jail’s inmate database, he was arrested on suspicion of second-degree rape, indicating force was used or the victim was incapable of consent due to being physically helpless, mentally incapacitated or developmentally disabled.
Nelly’s attorney Scott Rosenblum said, “Nelly is the victim of a completely fabricated allegation. Our initial investigation clearly establishes this allegation is devoid of credibility and is motivated by greed and vindictiveness. I am confident, once this scurrilous accusation is thoroughly investigated, there will be no charges. Nelly is prepared to address and pursue all legal avenues to redress any damage caused by this clearly false allegation.”
Nelly, 42, is a three-time Grammy winner, including for the song Hot in Herre, which won the best male rap solo performance award in 2002.
The following year, he shared a Grammy for the song Shake Ya Tailfeather with Murphy Lee and Sean Combs.


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