Friday, May 25, 2018 INFOTECH

Skip Navigation Links
 
link
 
link
SUPPLEMENT

Visitor Login










RED Hydrogen is the first holographic smartphone

RED, the company that makes high-end 4K cameras, has made a smartphone with amazing features. Without wearing glasses the user will watch 3D movies with its upcoming Hydrogen ONE smartphone. The cost of this Android phone will be around 10 percent higher than the iPhone X, which starts at $1000.
“The phone is for everybody who wants to change the way they view the world,” RED founder Jim Jannard said. “We see in multi view, yet everything we watch on our phones is in 2D. We want to change that, so you get your content in multi view.”
Jannard wrote,”While there are still a few things to add, it does everything we need from a cell phone... plus display 4-view content. I am totally happy. We both have exactly what we wanted.”
 
The 4View mode
When customers get their phones, they’ll be able to shoot their own photos and videos in what RED calls the 4View mode. RED is setting up what it calls the Hydrogen Network as a place where studios and filmmakers can have their 3D content converted to 4view. 
Hydrogen One will have a 5.7-inch screen capable of displaying 4View holographic content. In theory, that means users will be able to look around, below, and even into the screen’s image. 
Users will view stereo 3D content, as well as virtual reality, augmented reality, and regular 2D material. RED claims Hydrogen One is designed for “doers, makers and content creators.” 
RED is planning on starting with a module that is essentially a huge camera sensor — the company is not ready to give exact details, but the plan is definitely more towards DSLR size than smartphone size. Then, according to CEO Jim Jannard, the company wants any traditional big camera lens to be attached to it. Answering a fan question, he joked that support for lenses will be “pretty limited,”
 
Foundation of a future system
The company isn’t entering the smartphone game simply to sell a better Android phone (though it does have both Verizon and AT&T signed on to support it). This  phone is meant to be one piece of a modular system of cameras and other media creation equipment — the company claims it will be “the foundation of a future multi-dimensional media system.”
The Hydrogen One is larger than an iPhone 8 Plus, with a USB-C plug, stereo speakers, and a headphone jack. The processor will be slightly-out-of-date Qualcomm Snapdragon 835, but it seemed fast enough.  It’s probably going to be a perfectly capable phone.
The phone will have multi-channel spatial sound for both the internal stereo speakers and the headphones, the update post says. Jannard said the phone would also include a dual SIM slot, which is extremely useful for travelers.
In 2D mode, or normal cellphone mode, the resolution is said to be 2560x1440. That’s sharper than the 2463x1125 resolution of the slightly bigger iPhone X, which has a 5.8-inch display.
 
Holographic view
The other innovation on the Hydrogen One is a fancy new screen technology the company is calling “4-view.” It will allow users to switch the 2560 x 1440 screen from a standard 2D to 3D to a “holographic” view. It worked in both landscape and portrait and the depth of the 3D was also better than I’ve seen on a phone before — but of course that’s not very strong praise.
The last phone to really make a go at having a 3D display was the Amazon Fire Phone, which was of course a flop. With that phone, the combination of bad 3D and little reason for it to exist turned the entire enterprise into an industry punchline. For the Hydrogen One, RED is planning on creating a streaming service to provide holographic content.There are two front-facing cameras, as you need two to make a 3D effect.
RED is also doing more than just combining two images to make standard 3D — I’m told it’s trying to use an algorithm to blend multiple angles from those two lenses to create the effect.
It’s a hologram, basically, but it doesn’t really pop out of the screen so much as give you depth within it. I wouldn’t describe this screen as the reason to go out and buy this phone, but it was neat.
The company’s claim is that it can do for audio what it’s doing for images: create a virtual surround sound effect through its algorithms. In the demo, the “A3D” sound did have rich stereo separation just from the phone’s stereo speakers, but mostly they were just super loud.
However, with headphones the effect is more impressive. They said it effectively made you believe you were hearing noises directly behind and even above you.
People will be better served by getting something cheaper. As a hologram making and viewing machine, it’s a solid technical improvement.
The phone won’t need an additional module to shoot 3D or 4V on either the front or the back cameras, though. The other for the latest delay (in addition to finalizing carrier deals) was that RED wanted the phone to be able to shoot 4V in real time rather than having it convert 3D to 4V, according to the April post.
—Internet

Comment

RED, the company that makes high-end 4K cameras, has made a smartphone with amazing features. Without wearing glasses the user will watch 3D movies with its upcoming Hydrogen ONE smartphone. The cost of this Android phone will be around 10 percent higher than the iPhone X, which starts at $1000.
“The phone is for everybody who wants to change the way they view the world,” RED founder Jim Jannard said. “We see in multi view, yet everything we watch on our phones is in 2D. We want to change that, so you get your content in multi view.”
Jannard wrote,”While there are still a few things to add, it does everything we need from a cell phone... plus display 4-view content. I am totally happy. We both have exactly what we wanted.”
 
The 4View mode
When customers get their phones, they’ll be able to shoot their own photos and videos in what RED calls the 4View mode. RED is setting up what it calls the Hydrogen Network as a place where studios and filmmakers can have their 3D content converted to 4view. 
Hydrogen One will have a 5.7-inch screen capable of displaying 4View holographic content. In theory, that means users will be able to look around, below, and even into the screen’s image. 
Users will view stereo 3D content, as well as virtual reality, augmented reality, and regular 2D material. RED claims Hydrogen One is designed for “doers, makers and content creators.” 
RED is planning on starting with a module that is essentially a huge camera sensor — the company is not ready to give exact details, but the plan is definitely more towards DSLR size than smartphone size. Then, according to CEO Jim Jannard, the company wants any traditional big camera lens to be attached to it. Answering a fan question, he joked that support for lenses will be “pretty limited,”
 
Foundation of a future system
The company isn’t entering the smartphone game simply to sell a better Android phone (though it does have both Verizon and AT&T signed on to support it). This  phone is meant to be one piece of a modular system of cameras and other media creation equipment — the company claims it will be “the foundation of a future multi-dimensional media system.”
The Hydrogen One is larger than an iPhone 8 Plus, with a USB-C plug, stereo speakers, and a headphone jack. The processor will be slightly-out-of-date Qualcomm Snapdragon 835, but it seemed fast enough.  It’s probably going to be a perfectly capable phone.
The phone will have multi-channel spatial sound for both the internal stereo speakers and the headphones, the update post says. Jannard said the phone would also include a dual SIM slot, which is extremely useful for travelers.
In 2D mode, or normal cellphone mode, the resolution is said to be 2560x1440. That’s sharper than the 2463x1125 resolution of the slightly bigger iPhone X, which has a 5.8-inch display.
 
Holographic view
The other innovation on the Hydrogen One is a fancy new screen technology the company is calling “4-view.” It will allow users to switch the 2560 x 1440 screen from a standard 2D to 3D to a “holographic” view. It worked in both landscape and portrait and the depth of the 3D was also better than I’ve seen on a phone before — but of course that’s not very strong praise.
The last phone to really make a go at having a 3D display was the Amazon Fire Phone, which was of course a flop. With that phone, the combination of bad 3D and little reason for it to exist turned the entire enterprise into an industry punchline. For the Hydrogen One, RED is planning on creating a streaming service to provide holographic content.There are two front-facing cameras, as you need two to make a 3D effect.
RED is also doing more than just combining two images to make standard 3D — I’m told it’s trying to use an algorithm to blend multiple angles from those two lenses to create the effect.
It’s a hologram, basically, but it doesn’t really pop out of the screen so much as give you depth within it. I wouldn’t describe this screen as the reason to go out and buy this phone, but it was neat.
The company’s claim is that it can do for audio what it’s doing for images: create a virtual surround sound effect through its algorithms. In the demo, the “A3D” sound did have rich stereo separation just from the phone’s stereo speakers, but mostly they were just super loud.
However, with headphones the effect is more impressive. They said it effectively made you believe you were hearing noises directly behind and even above you.
People will be better served by getting something cheaper. As a hologram making and viewing machine, it’s a solid technical improvement.
The phone won’t need an additional module to shoot 3D or 4V on either the front or the back cameras, though. The other for the latest delay (in addition to finalizing carrier deals) was that RED wanted the phone to be able to shoot 4V in real time rather than having it convert 3D to 4V, according to the April post.
—Internet

Login to post comments


(0)



Drones are carrying cargoes

NATILUS, a 200-foot drone, is set to launch by 2020. The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is expected to carry a 200,000 cargo load, the same as a large jet, but at 70% of the cost in part due to its lower flying altitudes of approximately 80 feet above the ocean. Trips across oceans are expected to be about half of the expense involved in transporting freight by commercial air and, of course and faster at up to half the time. Energy to power the drone will come from jet fuel combined with turboprop and turbofan engines.
Amazon is already testing its “Prime Air” service that will bring drone-delivered packages at up to five pounds in 30 minutes to its customers. 
An important application for cargo drones as one would imagine is medical supply transport. 2015 saw the first drone flight that was Federal Aviation Administration-approved conducted in Virginia using a UAV built by the Australian company Flirtey.
 
Carrying blood supplies
In a recent issue of Transfusion results on a drone carrying blood supplies vouched for the technology’s effectiveness at preserving control of temperature-controlled containers. Timothy Amukele, Assistant Professor of Pathology, and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University assessed, even after suspecting acceleration or vibration might prove too altering, the hematological and microbial qualities of blood samples before and after drone transport. Fortunately, they found no damage or changes.
Specifically, the team evaluated several flights of 18 blood units in a five-quart cooler equipped with wet and dry ice and thermal packs using a drone made by DJI. Six leukoreduced red blood cell and six frozen plasma units were sent on flights up to 26.5 minutes. Following the arrivals, the Scientists checked for hemolysis, changes to the apheresis platelet count and other signs of compromise but found none. The temperature was consistently maintained.
 
Drones to transport cargo
Four Norwegian companies – including offshore vessel owner Olympic Subsea – are collaborating to investigate the use of unmanned aerial vehicles or drones to transport cargo between offshore vessels and offshore installations.
In addition to Olympic Subsea, the partners in the ‘Safer Logistics from Unmanned Logistics Helicopter’ research project include Griff Aviation, Norut (the Northern Research Institute), and STABLE, which specialises in motion-compensation technology.
Griff Aviation develops and manufactures drones that have capacity to carry heavy cargo. Norut is leading the project and has experience in developing autonomous control systems for unmanned air vehicles and of operating them in challenging weather conditions in northern waters.
The project is drawing on expertise from the research community at the faculty of engineering and technology at the Arctic University of Norway in Narvik, which has extensive experience in automated drone operations.
STABLE’s role is to develop a control system so that drones can operate from a moving platform. The company is developing a stable platform for take-off and landing of the drone. The platform would be placed in a container on a ship’s deck, which would also act as a hangar for the drone.
Olympic Subsea is an active development partner in the project, which is supported financially by the Research Council of Norway.
The partners in the project note that weather conditions play a major role in determining when cargo can be lifted from the deck of a vessel onto a rig or other installation.
Over the next 10 years, some experts predict drones will disrupt the logistics industry. The FAA has already issued drone-operating rules. Some companies other than Natilus and DJI in the drone-transport space include Matternet and MultiRotor.
For example, Matternet announced in 2016 a partnership with Mercedes Benz to supply their vans with aerial delivery drones that can be guided by cloud-linked routing software. Matternet has already received certifications from aviation officials in the United States and internationally to allow drone service along pre-defined urban and non-urban routes. For its transport applications, the company is using an M2 drone that can transport 4.4 pounds up to 12 miles per each battery charge.  Considered autonomous as in not needing human assistance, the drone both can deposit and pick up a payload including another battery.
Matternet or a rival’s technology might just be the preferred carrier for medical supplies, particularly given that Matternet is already mastering smart analytics such as proof of delivery for its M2. Medical Professionals like the members of the Johns Hopkins team would require such features. Already, that team is testing larger blood units such as ones that could be used for emergency transfusions. Thus, drone transports are quickly being thought of, not just for cargo and food perishables, but for any life-saving measures when the time is critical and the location of people can be difficult if not impossible to reach.
—Internet

Comment

NATILUS, a 200-foot drone, is set to launch by 2020. The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is expected to carry a 200,000 cargo load, the same as a large jet, but at 70% of the cost in part due to its lower flying altitudes of approximately 80 feet above the ocean. Trips across oceans are expected to be about half of the expense involved in transporting freight by commercial air and, of course and faster at up to half the time. Energy to power the drone will come from jet fuel combined with turboprop and turbofan engines.
Amazon is already testing its “Prime Air” service that will bring drone-delivered packages at up to five pounds in 30 minutes to its customers. 
An important application for cargo drones as one would imagine is medical supply transport. 2015 saw the first drone flight that was Federal Aviation Administration-approved conducted in Virginia using a UAV built by the Australian company Flirtey.
 
Carrying blood supplies
In a recent issue of Transfusion results on a drone carrying blood supplies vouched for the technology’s effectiveness at preserving control of temperature-controlled containers. Timothy Amukele, Assistant Professor of Pathology, and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University assessed, even after suspecting acceleration or vibration might prove too altering, the hematological and microbial qualities of blood samples before and after drone transport. Fortunately, they found no damage or changes.
Specifically, the team evaluated several flights of 18 blood units in a five-quart cooler equipped with wet and dry ice and thermal packs using a drone made by DJI. Six leukoreduced red blood cell and six frozen plasma units were sent on flights up to 26.5 minutes. Following the arrivals, the Scientists checked for hemolysis, changes to the apheresis platelet count and other signs of compromise but found none. The temperature was consistently maintained.
 
Drones to transport cargo
Four Norwegian companies – including offshore vessel owner Olympic Subsea – are collaborating to investigate the use of unmanned aerial vehicles or drones to transport cargo between offshore vessels and offshore installations.
In addition to Olympic Subsea, the partners in the ‘Safer Logistics from Unmanned Logistics Helicopter’ research project include Griff Aviation, Norut (the Northern Research Institute), and STABLE, which specialises in motion-compensation technology.
Griff Aviation develops and manufactures drones that have capacity to carry heavy cargo. Norut is leading the project and has experience in developing autonomous control systems for unmanned air vehicles and of operating them in challenging weather conditions in northern waters.
The project is drawing on expertise from the research community at the faculty of engineering and technology at the Arctic University of Norway in Narvik, which has extensive experience in automated drone operations.
STABLE’s role is to develop a control system so that drones can operate from a moving platform. The company is developing a stable platform for take-off and landing of the drone. The platform would be placed in a container on a ship’s deck, which would also act as a hangar for the drone.
Olympic Subsea is an active development partner in the project, which is supported financially by the Research Council of Norway.
The partners in the project note that weather conditions play a major role in determining when cargo can be lifted from the deck of a vessel onto a rig or other installation.
Over the next 10 years, some experts predict drones will disrupt the logistics industry. The FAA has already issued drone-operating rules. Some companies other than Natilus and DJI in the drone-transport space include Matternet and MultiRotor.
For example, Matternet announced in 2016 a partnership with Mercedes Benz to supply their vans with aerial delivery drones that can be guided by cloud-linked routing software. Matternet has already received certifications from aviation officials in the United States and internationally to allow drone service along pre-defined urban and non-urban routes. For its transport applications, the company is using an M2 drone that can transport 4.4 pounds up to 12 miles per each battery charge.  Considered autonomous as in not needing human assistance, the drone both can deposit and pick up a payload including another battery.
Matternet or a rival’s technology might just be the preferred carrier for medical supplies, particularly given that Matternet is already mastering smart analytics such as proof of delivery for its M2. Medical Professionals like the members of the Johns Hopkins team would require such features. Already, that team is testing larger blood units such as ones that could be used for emergency transfusions. Thus, drone transports are quickly being thought of, not just for cargo and food perishables, but for any life-saving measures when the time is critical and the location of people can be difficult if not impossible to reach.
—Internet

Login to post comments


(0)



METROPOLITAN
EDITORIAL
COMMENTS
INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS
INFOTECH
CULTURE
MISCELLANY
AVIATOUR
LAST WORD
FOUNDING EDITOR: ENAYETULLAH KHAN; EDITOR: SAYED KAMALUDDIN
Contents Copyrighted © by Holiday Publication Limited
Mailing address 30, Tejgaon Industrial Area, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh.
Phone 880-2-8170462, 8170463, 8170464 Fax 880-2-9127927 Email holiday@bangla.net
Site Managed By: Southtech Limited
Southtech Limited does not take any responsibility for any news content of this site