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Battery will keep its charge for 9 years!

TOP: Left to Right: Hemi Gandhi, Professor Michael Aziz, Andrew Wong, Dr. Qing Chen, Michael Gerhardt, Joy Perkinson, Dr. David Pastor
HARVARD scientists have developed a battery that stores energy in liquid solutions and could have a lifespan of about a decade. Not only is it super efficient, but this wonder battery is not corrosive or toxic either. The new flow battery stores energy in organic molecules dissolved in water. The non-toxic battery has a long lifetime and is cheaper than lithium alternatives. Researchers are trying to scale up the technology for industrial applications.
 
Change the world
The new flow battery was developed by researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).’Lithium ion batteries don’t even survive 1000 complete charge/discharge cycles,’ said Dr Michael Aziz, a professor of Materials and Energy Technologies at Harvard University. ‘If you can get anywhere near this cost target then you change the world,’ Dr Aziz said. 
‘It becomes cost effective to put batteries in so many places. This research puts us one step closer to reaching that target’, he said.
The team are using aqueous soluble ferrocene, a molecule which is good for storing charge and naturally insoluble.
‘Aqueous soluble ferrocenes represent a whole new class of molecules for flow batteries,’ said Dr Aziz. 
By modifying the molecules in the electrolytes, scientists have made these flow batteries stable, water-soluble and more resistant to degradation. 
As it is not corrosive, battery leaks do not cause the same damage as lithium-based ones.
 
Vastly improved cycle life
Although these batteries have been developed, there are currently no plans to sell them commercially. The Department of Energy (DOE) has set a goal of building a battery that would make it competitive with wind and solar energy. 
‘This work on aqueous soluble organic electrolytes is of high significance in pointing the way towards future batteries with vastly improved cycle life and considerably lower cost,’ said Imre Gyuk, Director of Energy Storage Research at the Office of Electricity of the DOE.
Harvard professor Michael J Aziz working on his revolutionary ‘rhubarb battery’
‘I expect that efficient, long duration flow batteries will become standard as part of the infrastructure of the electric grid.’ 
The researchers are currently trying to scale up the technology for industrial applications. 
 
Storage is a huge deal
“Storage is a huge deal,” says Ernest Moniz, the US Energy Secretary and himself a nuclear physicist. He is now confident that the US grid and power system will be completely “decarbonised” by the middle of the century.
The technology is poised to overcome the curse of ‘intermittency’ that has long bedevilled wind and solar. Surges of excess power will be stored for use later at times when the sun sets, and consumption peaks in the early evening.
This transforms the calculus of energy policy. The question for the British government as it designs a strategy fit for the 21st Century - and wrestles with an exorbitant commitment to Hinkley Point - is no longer whether this form of back-up power will ever be commercially viable, but whether the inflection point arrives in the early-2020s or in the late 2020s.
One front-runner - a Washington favourite - is an organic flow batteryat Harvard that uses quinones from cheap and abundant sources such as rhubarb or oil waste. It is much cheaper and less toxic than current flow batteries based on the rare metal vanadium. Its reactions are 1,000 times faster.
 
The old order smashed
The world’s next energy revolution is probably no more than five or ten years away. Cutting-edge research into cheap and clean forms of electricity storage is moving so fast that we may never again need to build 20th Century power plants in this country, let alone a nuclear white elephant such as Hinkley Point.
Flow batteries store energy in liquid solutions.
There are plans for hydrogen bromide, or zinc-air batteries, or storage in molten glass, or next-generation flywheels, many claiming “drastic improvements” that can slash storage costs by 80pc to 90pc and reach the magical figure of $100 per kilowatt hour in relatively short order.
The technology is poised to overcome the curse of ‘intermittency’ that has long bedevilled wind and solar. Surges of excess power will be stored for use later at times when the sun sets, and consumption peaks in the early evening.
This transforms the calculus of energy policy. The question for the British government as it designs a strategy fit for the 21st Century - and wrestles with an exorbitant commitment to Hinkley Point - is no longer whether this form of back-up power will ever be commercially viable, but whether the inflection point arrives in the early-2020s or in the late 2020s.
One front-runner - a Washington favourite - is an organic flow batteryat Harvard that uses quinones from cheap and abundant sources such as rhubarb or oil waste. It is much cheaper and less toxic than current flow batteries based on the rare metal vanadium. Its reactions are 1,000 times faster.
Professor Michael Aziz, leader of the Harvard project, said there are still problems to sort out with the “calendar life” of storage chemicals but the basic design is essentially proven.
“We have a fighting chance of bringing down the capital cost to $100 a kilowatt hour, and that will change the world. It could complement wind and solar on a very large scale,” he told a newspaper.
The latest refinement is to replace toxic bromine with harmless ferrocyanide - used in food additives. The battery cannot catch fire. It is safe and clean. “This is chemistry I’d be happy to put in my basement,” he said.
The design is delightfully simple. It uses a tank of water. You could have one at home in Los Angeles, Lagos, Buenos Aires, Delhi, or Guangzhou, storing solar power in the day to drive your air-conditioning at night. It could be scaled up for a 500 megawatt wind farm.
—Internet

Comment

TOP: Left to Right: Hemi Gandhi, Professor Michael Aziz, Andrew Wong, Dr. Qing Chen, Michael Gerhardt, Joy Perkinson, Dr. David Pastor
HARVARD scientists have developed a battery that stores energy in liquid solutions and could have a lifespan of about a decade. Not only is it super efficient, but this wonder battery is not corrosive or toxic either. The new flow battery stores energy in organic molecules dissolved in water. The non-toxic battery has a long lifetime and is cheaper than lithium alternatives. Researchers are trying to scale up the technology for industrial applications.
 
Change the world
The new flow battery was developed by researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).’Lithium ion batteries don’t even survive 1000 complete charge/discharge cycles,’ said Dr Michael Aziz, a professor of Materials and Energy Technologies at Harvard University. ‘If you can get anywhere near this cost target then you change the world,’ Dr Aziz said. 
‘It becomes cost effective to put batteries in so many places. This research puts us one step closer to reaching that target’, he said.
The team are using aqueous soluble ferrocene, a molecule which is good for storing charge and naturally insoluble.
‘Aqueous soluble ferrocenes represent a whole new class of molecules for flow batteries,’ said Dr Aziz. 
By modifying the molecules in the electrolytes, scientists have made these flow batteries stable, water-soluble and more resistant to degradation. 
As it is not corrosive, battery leaks do not cause the same damage as lithium-based ones.
 
Vastly improved cycle life
Although these batteries have been developed, there are currently no plans to sell them commercially. The Department of Energy (DOE) has set a goal of building a battery that would make it competitive with wind and solar energy. 
‘This work on aqueous soluble organic electrolytes is of high significance in pointing the way towards future batteries with vastly improved cycle life and considerably lower cost,’ said Imre Gyuk, Director of Energy Storage Research at the Office of Electricity of the DOE.
Harvard professor Michael J Aziz working on his revolutionary ‘rhubarb battery’
‘I expect that efficient, long duration flow batteries will become standard as part of the infrastructure of the electric grid.’ 
The researchers are currently trying to scale up the technology for industrial applications. 
 
Storage is a huge deal
“Storage is a huge deal,” says Ernest Moniz, the US Energy Secretary and himself a nuclear physicist. He is now confident that the US grid and power system will be completely “decarbonised” by the middle of the century.
The technology is poised to overcome the curse of ‘intermittency’ that has long bedevilled wind and solar. Surges of excess power will be stored for use later at times when the sun sets, and consumption peaks in the early evening.
This transforms the calculus of energy policy. The question for the British government as it designs a strategy fit for the 21st Century - and wrestles with an exorbitant commitment to Hinkley Point - is no longer whether this form of back-up power will ever be commercially viable, but whether the inflection point arrives in the early-2020s or in the late 2020s.
One front-runner - a Washington favourite - is an organic flow batteryat Harvard that uses quinones from cheap and abundant sources such as rhubarb or oil waste. It is much cheaper and less toxic than current flow batteries based on the rare metal vanadium. Its reactions are 1,000 times faster.
 
The old order smashed
The world’s next energy revolution is probably no more than five or ten years away. Cutting-edge research into cheap and clean forms of electricity storage is moving so fast that we may never again need to build 20th Century power plants in this country, let alone a nuclear white elephant such as Hinkley Point.
Flow batteries store energy in liquid solutions.
There are plans for hydrogen bromide, or zinc-air batteries, or storage in molten glass, or next-generation flywheels, many claiming “drastic improvements” that can slash storage costs by 80pc to 90pc and reach the magical figure of $100 per kilowatt hour in relatively short order.
The technology is poised to overcome the curse of ‘intermittency’ that has long bedevilled wind and solar. Surges of excess power will be stored for use later at times when the sun sets, and consumption peaks in the early evening.
This transforms the calculus of energy policy. The question for the British government as it designs a strategy fit for the 21st Century - and wrestles with an exorbitant commitment to Hinkley Point - is no longer whether this form of back-up power will ever be commercially viable, but whether the inflection point arrives in the early-2020s or in the late 2020s.
One front-runner - a Washington favourite - is an organic flow batteryat Harvard that uses quinones from cheap and abundant sources such as rhubarb or oil waste. It is much cheaper and less toxic than current flow batteries based on the rare metal vanadium. Its reactions are 1,000 times faster.
Professor Michael Aziz, leader of the Harvard project, said there are still problems to sort out with the “calendar life” of storage chemicals but the basic design is essentially proven.
“We have a fighting chance of bringing down the capital cost to $100 a kilowatt hour, and that will change the world. It could complement wind and solar on a very large scale,” he told a newspaper.
The latest refinement is to replace toxic bromine with harmless ferrocyanide - used in food additives. The battery cannot catch fire. It is safe and clean. “This is chemistry I’d be happy to put in my basement,” he said.
The design is delightfully simple. It uses a tank of water. You could have one at home in Los Angeles, Lagos, Buenos Aires, Delhi, or Guangzhou, storing solar power in the day to drive your air-conditioning at night. It could be scaled up for a 500 megawatt wind farm.
—Internet

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POWERED BY GASTRIC FLUIDS
Ingestible medical device
SCIENTISTS have been attempting to produce practical ingestible electronics for years, and now researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, may have figured out how to power them using surrounding fluids in the gut. Previously developed ingestible electronics typically use batteries that contain materials that, if leaked, are toxic to the human body. Other techniques, such as harvesting heat or vibrations from the surroundings, have been attempted. However, most of these methods don’t produce enough consistent energy to power the sensors in the devices.
Giovanni Traverso, the senior author of the study, worked with Robert Langer, a professor at the David H. Koch Institute and Anantha Chandrakasan, head of MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, to develop a power source that circumvented these problems. This novel method of providing energy to ingested devices is essentially a voltaic cell. A voltaic cell utilizes two electrodes and an acid to stimulate the flow of electrons to produce a small electric current. To replicate this, the researchers incorporated zinc and copper electrodes on the surface of their sensor. Once ingested, the stomach acid acts as an electrolyte and facilitates the releases of ions from the zinc anode to the copper cathode. The voltaic cell produces .23 microwatts per square millimeter of anode.
In their experiments, the researchers found this method produced enough electricity to energize commercial temperature sensors and a 900-megahertz transmitter for an average of six days in live pigs. In additional experiments, the researchers showed that a capsule equipped with this novel system could be used to electrically corrode a gold membrane to release drugs.
Currently, the device is 40 millimeters long and 12 millimeters in diameter, but researchers believe that by using customized integrated circuits which would carry the voltaic cell, transmitter, and microprocessor, the device could become considerably smaller.
—Internet

Comment

SCIENTISTS have been attempting to produce practical ingestible electronics for years, and now researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, may have figured out how to power them using surrounding fluids in the gut. Previously developed ingestible electronics typically use batteries that contain materials that, if leaked, are toxic to the human body. Other techniques, such as harvesting heat or vibrations from the surroundings, have been attempted. However, most of these methods don’t produce enough consistent energy to power the sensors in the devices.
Giovanni Traverso, the senior author of the study, worked with Robert Langer, a professor at the David H. Koch Institute and Anantha Chandrakasan, head of MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, to develop a power source that circumvented these problems. This novel method of providing energy to ingested devices is essentially a voltaic cell. A voltaic cell utilizes two electrodes and an acid to stimulate the flow of electrons to produce a small electric current. To replicate this, the researchers incorporated zinc and copper electrodes on the surface of their sensor. Once ingested, the stomach acid acts as an electrolyte and facilitates the releases of ions from the zinc anode to the copper cathode. The voltaic cell produces .23 microwatts per square millimeter of anode.
In their experiments, the researchers found this method produced enough electricity to energize commercial temperature sensors and a 900-megahertz transmitter for an average of six days in live pigs. In additional experiments, the researchers showed that a capsule equipped with this novel system could be used to electrically corrode a gold membrane to release drugs.
Currently, the device is 40 millimeters long and 12 millimeters in diameter, but researchers believe that by using customized integrated circuits which would carry the voltaic cell, transmitter, and microprocessor, the device could become considerably smaller.
—Internet

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Core i5 Surface Pro 4 portable PC

THE GOOD The Surface Pro 4 fits a larger screen with a higher resolution into a slightly slimmer body than last year’s model. The pen and keyboard cover are also improved, and this is one of the first mobile systems shipping with Intel’s latest processors.
THE BAD Microsoft still refuses to include the Type Cover keyboard by default, forcing a separate purchase. Battery life still isn’t enough for a full day.
THE BOTTOM LINE A host of small refinements cements the Surface Pro 4’s position as the best-in-class Windows tablet — so long as you’re prepared to pay extra for the required keyboard cover accessory.
MICROSOFT finally delivered the goods with the Surface Pro 4. Equipped with robust processing power, a perfectly sized display and just-right aspect ratio, and a few critical add-on accessories, the Pro 4 solidified the Surface’s position as the gold standard for Windows tablets. And with the arrival of Windows 10 in July 2015, that which blemished all previous Surface models — an inelegant operating system — was finally replaced by a solid OS that could fulfill the potential of its form factor.
 
Surface Studio
Microsoft has also unveiled the $2,999 Surface Studio — a desktop PC for artists and designers in need of high-end horsepower and display — and the $100 Surface Dial accessory, a touch-friendly dial designed to sit beside your keyboard for fine contextual controls in whatever program you’re using. Clearly, Microsoft is on something of an innovation turn, and rumors about the next generation Surface Pro continue to smolder — but don’t expect that inevitable model until sometime in 2017.
But, as a very refined product, the Surface Pro 4 is expensive. The wide variety of configuration options and accessories mean that its starting price of $899, £749 or AU$1,349 is not very realistic. For that entry price, you get a Surface Pro tablet with an Intel Core M3.
 
Design and features
The earliest Surface Pro models were 13mm thick, while last year’s Surface Pro 3 shaved that down to 9.1mm. This year, we’re down to 8.4mm, despite increasing the size of the screen. Both the Surface Pro 3 and Surface Pro 4 are 1.7 pounds (771 grams) by themselves, or 2.5 pounds (1.13 kg) with their keyboard cover and stylus pens attached.
One of the biggest improvements to last year’s Surface Pro carries over here: the highly adjustable kickstand, which can be adjusted to nearly any angle between 22 and 150 degrees. The kickstand, which runs the entire width of the system, is stiff enough that it will stay where you put it, and hardly moves at all, even when using your fingers or the pen on the touchscreen.
—Internet

 

Comment

THE GOOD The Surface Pro 4 fits a larger screen with a higher resolution into a slightly slimmer body than last year’s model. The pen and keyboard cover are also improved, and this is one of the first mobile systems shipping with Intel’s latest processors.
THE BAD Microsoft still refuses to include the Type Cover keyboard by default, forcing a separate purchase. Battery life still isn’t enough for a full day.
THE BOTTOM LINE A host of small refinements cements the Surface Pro 4’s position as the best-in-class Windows tablet — so long as you’re prepared to pay extra for the required keyboard cover accessory.
MICROSOFT finally delivered the goods with the Surface Pro 4. Equipped with robust processing power, a perfectly sized display and just-right aspect ratio, and a few critical add-on accessories, the Pro 4 solidified the Surface’s position as the gold standard for Windows tablets. And with the arrival of Windows 10 in July 2015, that which blemished all previous Surface models — an inelegant operating system — was finally replaced by a solid OS that could fulfill the potential of its form factor.
 
Surface Studio
Microsoft has also unveiled the $2,999 Surface Studio — a desktop PC for artists and designers in need of high-end horsepower and display — and the $100 Surface Dial accessory, a touch-friendly dial designed to sit beside your keyboard for fine contextual controls in whatever program you’re using. Clearly, Microsoft is on something of an innovation turn, and rumors about the next generation Surface Pro continue to smolder — but don’t expect that inevitable model until sometime in 2017.
But, as a very refined product, the Surface Pro 4 is expensive. The wide variety of configuration options and accessories mean that its starting price of $899, £749 or AU$1,349 is not very realistic. For that entry price, you get a Surface Pro tablet with an Intel Core M3.
 
Design and features
The earliest Surface Pro models were 13mm thick, while last year’s Surface Pro 3 shaved that down to 9.1mm. This year, we’re down to 8.4mm, despite increasing the size of the screen. Both the Surface Pro 3 and Surface Pro 4 are 1.7 pounds (771 grams) by themselves, or 2.5 pounds (1.13 kg) with their keyboard cover and stylus pens attached.
One of the biggest improvements to last year’s Surface Pro carries over here: the highly adjustable kickstand, which can be adjusted to nearly any angle between 22 and 150 degrees. The kickstand, which runs the entire width of the system, is stiff enough that it will stay where you put it, and hardly moves at all, even when using your fingers or the pen on the touchscreen.
—Internet

 


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