Friday, January 18, 2019 COMMENTS

Skip Navigation Links
 
link
 
link
SUPPLEMENT

Visitor Login










If elected to power, will probe all killings: Farooq Abdullah

Top militant commander killed in Kashmir

Online Agencies

Kashmiri National Conference chief and parliamentarian Farooq Abdullah Saturday said if his party is elected to power he will announce probe into all killings by a truth and reconciliation commission.

Abdullah asked people to support the NC and give it a full mandate in the upcoming assembly polls to bring an end to the human rights violations.

Talking to the media men on the sidelines of the workers’ meet in Dakbanglow in Anantnag, Farooq Abdullah said, “We hope that God brings our party to power strongly and we don’t have to stand on crutches (referring to the coalition). This (probe) will be a great thing that we will announce on the very first day when the new government will take over,” he said.

He added, “We will appoint a commission (Truth and Reconciliation Commission) and see to it that the results are brought before the people,” said Abdullah.

Abdullah who represents Srinagar-Budgam constituency in the LokSabha said his son and NC vice-president Omar Abdullah has already asked for such commission.

Abdullah also said his party won’t support ‘Operation All-out’ launched against the militants.

“How can we support such a thing where there is suppression? It is not a question of ‘all out’. We don’t want our people to suffer. That has never been part of National Conference’s policy,” he said when asked whether his party will support the continuation of ‘Operation All-out’.

Abdullah said his party was not going to support any violence or violation of human rights. “Everyone is free, we live in a free country. And therefore we as a government will have to see that freedom expression is not curbed,” he said.

“All political parties are unanimous in their stand against the civilian killings.  These killings should not happen at all. Even the United Nations Human Rights Commission has taken note of it,” Farooq added.

Accusing BJP of whipping up communal passions and dividing people in India, Abdullah, said, “The communal forces are up to divide us on the pretext of religion, caste, creed and language. However, we have secular-minded people in our country who have come together to fight them.”

He said that during the past five years of the BJP rule, “not only the Muslims but all minorities have suffered. Dalits and farmers have faced the worst form of oppression under this government.” 

Earlier, Abdullah flanked by senior party leaders Ali Mohammad Sagar, Nasir AslamWani, AltafWani (Kaloo) and Syed Basheer Ahmad Shah (Veeray) welcomed several people into the party fold. 

Those who joined the NC included PDP district coordinator for Anantnag Advocate GhulamMuhamadThokroo and Farooq Ganai son of former NC minister Akbar Ganai from Dooru.

Ganai who had unsuccessfully contested 2014 assembly elections from Dooru on the NC ticket rejoined the party two years after he had quit it.

Top commander  killed

Meanwhile, Kashmiri  Al Badr commander Zeenat-ul-Islam, and his associate Shakeel Dar, were killed in a gunfight in south Kashmir’s Kulgam district late on Saturday evening.

A police official said the gunfight broke out at Kathpora village following an operation launched by a joint team of the Army’s 34 Rashtriya Rifles, the SOG of J&K Police and the CRPF. “It was a brief gunfight in which two militants were killed,” the police official said.

“The militants were caught unawares as the army men came in sumo vehicles and opened fire triggering a brief exchange of fire,” the official said.

Islam, 30, alias Usman hailing from Sugan village of restive Zainapora in Shopian district was listed in police records as category A++ militant and carried a bounty of Rs 12.5 lakh on his head.

He was a known “cordon breaker” and had on several occasions given government forces a slip during search operations including a major encounter in Dragad-Sugan in Shopian on 1 April 2018 in which seven militants from Hizb-ul-Mujahideen were killed. That time Islam was associated with Hizb.

In November, last year Islam, however, left Hizb to join Al-Badr. In an audio message in which he had announced his decision Islam had described Hizb chief RiyazNaikoo as his “leader and inspiration” while maintaining that the decision was taken after a “consensus between two armed groups and in order to strengthen his parent outfit (Al Badr)”.

A Bachelor in Science, Islam, according to police, worked with Al Badr militant outfit from 2008 when he was arrested for the first time, and booked under the Public Safety Act (PSA).

After being released he had married and has a daughter. However, soon he had recycled into the militant ranks. “Initially, he was associated with Lashkar-e-Toiba (LeT) but soon he switched over to Hizb and rose in its ranks to become district commander of Shopian,” a police official said.

The tall, long-haired, Islam worked with slain top commanders of Hizb like WaseemMalla and SadamPaddar, and Wasim Shah of LeT to revive militancy in Shopian, said another police official. He was a regular during funerals of his associates.

He was active in militant ranks since 2015 and was regarded as an IED expert too. “Islam could have helped the outfit (Al Badr) grow as he was the key recruiter in the south. His killing is certainly a blow to militancy in Kashmir,” the police official said.

Director General of Police Dilbag Singh had earlier told Greater Kashmir that the bodies have been retrieved from the gunfight site. “The family (of Zeenat) is in denial mode, but the looks and other circumstances indicate Zeenat is one among the two militants killed,” he told Greater Kashmir late in the evening.

Areal Firing

Meanwhile, Government forces on Sunday resorted to aerial firing as the mourners were gathering to participate in the funeral prayers of Al Badr commander Zeenat ul Islam at his native Sugan village of south Kashmir’s Shopian district.

Witnesses said the forces had sealed all roads leading to Sugan village to limit the number of people participating in the funeral of Islam.

However, they said, mourners continued to assemble in the village after making their way through orchards.

Soon after the forces resorted to aerial firing to disperse the people, an eye witness said, the youth pelted them with stones, triggering clashes.

Comment

Top militant commander killed in Kashmir

Online Agencies

Kashmiri National Conference chief and parliamentarian Farooq Abdullah Saturday said if his party is elected to power he will announce probe into all killings by a truth and reconciliation commission.

Abdullah asked people to support the NC and give it a full mandate in the upcoming assembly polls to bring an end to the human rights violations.

Talking to the media men on the sidelines of the workers’ meet in Dakbanglow in Anantnag, Farooq Abdullah said, “We hope that God brings our party to power strongly and we don’t have to stand on crutches (referring to the coalition). This (probe) will be a great thing that we will announce on the very first day when the new government will take over,” he said.

He added, “We will appoint a commission (Truth and Reconciliation Commission) and see to it that the results are brought before the people,” said Abdullah.

Abdullah who represents Srinagar-Budgam constituency in the LokSabha said his son and NC vice-president Omar Abdullah has already asked for such commission.

Abdullah also said his party won’t support ‘Operation All-out’ launched against the militants.

“How can we support such a thing where there is suppression? It is not a question of ‘all out’. We don’t want our people to suffer. That has never been part of National Conference’s policy,” he said when asked whether his party will support the continuation of ‘Operation All-out’.

Abdullah said his party was not going to support any violence or violation of human rights. “Everyone is free, we live in a free country. And therefore we as a government will have to see that freedom expression is not curbed,” he said.

“All political parties are unanimous in their stand against the civilian killings.  These killings should not happen at all. Even the United Nations Human Rights Commission has taken note of it,” Farooq added.

Accusing BJP of whipping up communal passions and dividing people in India, Abdullah, said, “The communal forces are up to divide us on the pretext of religion, caste, creed and language. However, we have secular-minded people in our country who have come together to fight them.”

He said that during the past five years of the BJP rule, “not only the Muslims but all minorities have suffered. Dalits and farmers have faced the worst form of oppression under this government.” 

Earlier, Abdullah flanked by senior party leaders Ali Mohammad Sagar, Nasir AslamWani, AltafWani (Kaloo) and Syed Basheer Ahmad Shah (Veeray) welcomed several people into the party fold. 

Those who joined the NC included PDP district coordinator for Anantnag Advocate GhulamMuhamadThokroo and Farooq Ganai son of former NC minister Akbar Ganai from Dooru.

Ganai who had unsuccessfully contested 2014 assembly elections from Dooru on the NC ticket rejoined the party two years after he had quit it.

Top commander  killed

Meanwhile, Kashmiri  Al Badr commander Zeenat-ul-Islam, and his associate Shakeel Dar, were killed in a gunfight in south Kashmir’s Kulgam district late on Saturday evening.

A police official said the gunfight broke out at Kathpora village following an operation launched by a joint team of the Army’s 34 Rashtriya Rifles, the SOG of J&K Police and the CRPF. “It was a brief gunfight in which two militants were killed,” the police official said.

“The militants were caught unawares as the army men came in sumo vehicles and opened fire triggering a brief exchange of fire,” the official said.

Islam, 30, alias Usman hailing from Sugan village of restive Zainapora in Shopian district was listed in police records as category A++ militant and carried a bounty of Rs 12.5 lakh on his head.

He was a known “cordon breaker” and had on several occasions given government forces a slip during search operations including a major encounter in Dragad-Sugan in Shopian on 1 April 2018 in which seven militants from Hizb-ul-Mujahideen were killed. That time Islam was associated with Hizb.

In November, last year Islam, however, left Hizb to join Al-Badr. In an audio message in which he had announced his decision Islam had described Hizb chief RiyazNaikoo as his “leader and inspiration” while maintaining that the decision was taken after a “consensus between two armed groups and in order to strengthen his parent outfit (Al Badr)”.

A Bachelor in Science, Islam, according to police, worked with Al Badr militant outfit from 2008 when he was arrested for the first time, and booked under the Public Safety Act (PSA).

After being released he had married and has a daughter. However, soon he had recycled into the militant ranks. “Initially, he was associated with Lashkar-e-Toiba (LeT) but soon he switched over to Hizb and rose in its ranks to become district commander of Shopian,” a police official said.

The tall, long-haired, Islam worked with slain top commanders of Hizb like WaseemMalla and SadamPaddar, and Wasim Shah of LeT to revive militancy in Shopian, said another police official. He was a regular during funerals of his associates.

He was active in militant ranks since 2015 and was regarded as an IED expert too. “Islam could have helped the outfit (Al Badr) grow as he was the key recruiter in the south. His killing is certainly a blow to militancy in Kashmir,” the police official said.

Director General of Police Dilbag Singh had earlier told Greater Kashmir that the bodies have been retrieved from the gunfight site. “The family (of Zeenat) is in denial mode, but the looks and other circumstances indicate Zeenat is one among the two militants killed,” he told Greater Kashmir late in the evening.

Areal Firing

Meanwhile, Government forces on Sunday resorted to aerial firing as the mourners were gathering to participate in the funeral prayers of Al Badr commander Zeenat ul Islam at his native Sugan village of south Kashmir’s Shopian district.

Witnesses said the forces had sealed all roads leading to Sugan village to limit the number of people participating in the funeral of Islam.

However, they said, mourners continued to assemble in the village after making their way through orchards.

Soon after the forces resorted to aerial firing to disperse the people, an eye witness said, the youth pelted them with stones, triggering clashes.


Login to post comments


(0)



Kuwaiti girls use martial arts to counter bullies and violence

TeleSur
 
A woman is assaulted every day in Kuwait, according to Ghada al-Ghanem, of the Women’s Cultural and Social Society.
Asma Hasnawi and her daughter Riham spend more than 12 hours a week learning kajukenbo, a mixed martial art the mother says boosts her child’s confidence and thwarts bullying.
In a small hall in Kuwait City, women and girls in black uniforms gather to learn the basics of self-defense. On their left sleeves are the flags of Kuwait and the U.S. state of Hawaii, where the hybrid martial art of kajukenbo was developed in the 1940s. The sport’s name was derived from the various forms of martial arts it includes: karate (KA), judo and jujitsu (JU), kenpo (KEN) and boxing (BO).
Each form teaches techniques that can be used to fend off an attack, says Hasnawi, 33, who stands in class alongside her 12-year-old daughter and other girls. “I initially wanted to explore this sport, but I continued to practice it to be able to defend myself,” she tells AFP. Hasnawi still remembers being bullied as a child — something her daughter has struggled with at school too.
But she says Riham has “changed a lot” since they started practicing kajukenbo, gaining patience and strength through the sport. “She has transformed. At school, she used to get really angry and quickly agitated if someone would say something to her,” Hasnawi says. “Now, it’s something normal that she can (healthily) deal with.”
There is no recent data in Kuwait on cases of violence against women, who enjoy more freedoms than those in neighboring countries. The Women’s Cultural and Social Society or WCSS, whose goal is to help and encourage women’s participation in the Kuwaiti community, has dealt with a number of assault cases and Ghanem believes the actual figure may be higher than one per day.
Hung on the red and black walls of the Street Warrior Academy is a poster of two men practicing the sport. “Kajukenbo teaches your child the methods and arts of self-defense,” it reads, complimenting the mottos of “strength and honor” and “street warrior” on the backs of the girls’ uniforms.
The students closely watch their instructor, Faisal al-Gharib, as he explains how to counter an attack with the help of his son.
The girls then pair up to take what they have learnt and put it into practice. In another instance, the instructor’s son mimics an attack with a wooden knife on one of the more experienced pupils, who wears a black belt.
Already familiar with the exercise, the student explains: “I pretend that I have surrendered... and then I grab his hand on my neck, push it down and move it away.”
More than 120 girls and women between the ages of four and 50 participate in the academy’s different kajukenbo classes, which are held in a room with training weapons lining its walls. Some 40 men and boys also currently take part in kajukenbo classes at the club on different days from the women.
For Um Saleh, the sport has helped her twin 13-year-old daughters become more independent and decisive. “It gave them something to focus on other than social media,” she says.
Gharib, the instructor, established the academy in 2014 after learning kajukenbo in the United States.
As part of the training, he presents his students with different scenarios, including assaults and knife attacks. “We focus on self-defense skills and place the girls in conditions similar to those on the street so we can build their self-confidence and teach them exactly when and where to expect the hit,” Gharib says.
The academy, which has a strict confidentiality policy, has become a safe haven for many girls and women that have been victims of assault or bullying. It is one of dozens of similar clubs and academies that have opened in Kuwait as kajukenbo gains popularity. Although in the rest of the Gulf, the sport remains relatively unknown.
“Being a (victim) of assault, whether in school or on the street, is what pushed some of these girls and women to pursue the sport,” says Fai al-Fahed, one of the instructors. “Ultimately, girls are embracing this kind of martial art and we see it boosting their self-confidence.”
Khalida Bashir says she was drawn to kajukenbo after watching clips of the sport online. “I used to be afraid of everything, but this sport changed me,” she tells AFP. “I have become more confident and more patient. Some say this is a man’s sport, but that is, in fact, not true.”

Comment

TeleSur
 
A woman is assaulted every day in Kuwait, according to Ghada al-Ghanem, of the Women’s Cultural and Social Society.
Asma Hasnawi and her daughter Riham spend more than 12 hours a week learning kajukenbo, a mixed martial art the mother says boosts her child’s confidence and thwarts bullying.
In a small hall in Kuwait City, women and girls in black uniforms gather to learn the basics of self-defense. On their left sleeves are the flags of Kuwait and the U.S. state of Hawaii, where the hybrid martial art of kajukenbo was developed in the 1940s. The sport’s name was derived from the various forms of martial arts it includes: karate (KA), judo and jujitsu (JU), kenpo (KEN) and boxing (BO).
Each form teaches techniques that can be used to fend off an attack, says Hasnawi, 33, who stands in class alongside her 12-year-old daughter and other girls. “I initially wanted to explore this sport, but I continued to practice it to be able to defend myself,” she tells AFP. Hasnawi still remembers being bullied as a child — something her daughter has struggled with at school too.
But she says Riham has “changed a lot” since they started practicing kajukenbo, gaining patience and strength through the sport. “She has transformed. At school, she used to get really angry and quickly agitated if someone would say something to her,” Hasnawi says. “Now, it’s something normal that she can (healthily) deal with.”
There is no recent data in Kuwait on cases of violence against women, who enjoy more freedoms than those in neighboring countries. The Women’s Cultural and Social Society or WCSS, whose goal is to help and encourage women’s participation in the Kuwaiti community, has dealt with a number of assault cases and Ghanem believes the actual figure may be higher than one per day.
Hung on the red and black walls of the Street Warrior Academy is a poster of two men practicing the sport. “Kajukenbo teaches your child the methods and arts of self-defense,” it reads, complimenting the mottos of “strength and honor” and “street warrior” on the backs of the girls’ uniforms.
The students closely watch their instructor, Faisal al-Gharib, as he explains how to counter an attack with the help of his son.
The girls then pair up to take what they have learnt and put it into practice. In another instance, the instructor’s son mimics an attack with a wooden knife on one of the more experienced pupils, who wears a black belt.
Already familiar with the exercise, the student explains: “I pretend that I have surrendered... and then I grab his hand on my neck, push it down and move it away.”
More than 120 girls and women between the ages of four and 50 participate in the academy’s different kajukenbo classes, which are held in a room with training weapons lining its walls. Some 40 men and boys also currently take part in kajukenbo classes at the club on different days from the women.
For Um Saleh, the sport has helped her twin 13-year-old daughters become more independent and decisive. “It gave them something to focus on other than social media,” she says.
Gharib, the instructor, established the academy in 2014 after learning kajukenbo in the United States.
As part of the training, he presents his students with different scenarios, including assaults and knife attacks. “We focus on self-defense skills and place the girls in conditions similar to those on the street so we can build their self-confidence and teach them exactly when and where to expect the hit,” Gharib says.
The academy, which has a strict confidentiality policy, has become a safe haven for many girls and women that have been victims of assault or bullying. It is one of dozens of similar clubs and academies that have opened in Kuwait as kajukenbo gains popularity. Although in the rest of the Gulf, the sport remains relatively unknown.
“Being a (victim) of assault, whether in school or on the street, is what pushed some of these girls and women to pursue the sport,” says Fai al-Fahed, one of the instructors. “Ultimately, girls are embracing this kind of martial art and we see it boosting their self-confidence.”
Khalida Bashir says she was drawn to kajukenbo after watching clips of the sport online. “I used to be afraid of everything, but this sport changed me,” she tells AFP. “I have become more confident and more patient. Some say this is a man’s sport, but that is, in fact, not true.”

Login to post comments


(0)



Bridging the Infrastructure Financing Gap in the Asia Pacific Region
Credit: Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP)
Tientip Subhanij and Daniel W. Lin
 
Infrastructure development is undoubtedly critical for a country’s long-term economic growth and competitiveness as it impacts economic activities by increasing productivity, facilitating trade, and promoting innovation.
Across the Asia Pacific region, however, economic growth as well as broader development goals are hindered by a shortage of roads, mass rapid transit systems, telecommunications, power plants, water and sanitation and other basic infrastructure.
The Asian Development Bank estimates that the average infrastructure requirement for a representative group of 24 developing countries in the region for 2016 to 2020 is 8.2 per cent of the GDP when China is excluded.
However, their current investments average only 3.2 per cent of GDP, leaving the financing gap as large as 5 per cent of GDP. Notably, of the 3.2 per cent of GDP currently invested in infrastructure on average, only 1 per cent of GDP comes from the private sector.
Adding to this challenge, private sector participation in infrastructure investment in emerging markets dropped by 37 percent between 2015 and 2016 globally, reaching the lowest level in 10 years.
Understanding the decline in private investment and how countries can encourage more private sector participation will, therefore, be important in achieving sustainable infrastructure development in the region.
The most recent successful example of engaging private sector financing is from Thailand, where the government has launched a new way to raise private capital through Thailand Future Fund (TFF). Traded on the Stock Exchange of Thailand, the TFF is a 44.7 billion Baht infrastructure mutual fund that aims at raising capital from institutional and private retail investors for the country’s infrastructure development.
The fund invests in value-enhancing state agencies’ infrastructure assets and projects to create long-term distribution growth potential, including expressways, railways, electricity generation and distribution, airports, and deep seaports.
An IPO was made from October 12 to 19 with prices set at 10 Baht each. Since then, major local institutional investors have shown great interest in TFF.
The TTF has the advantage of reducing the government’s burden on public finance by providing fund raising alternative. This is expected to accelerate the Thai government investment in infrastructure projects, which can be injected into TFF in the future, thus, providing institutional and retail investors the opportunity to invest in high performing and stable income infrastructure projects.
The Fund also promotes the development of Thailand’s capital markets by facilitating private sector investment in infrastructure development, which is considered a low risk long-term investment, allowing greater diversification for private investors.
The mobilization of private resources, including through public-private partnerships (PPP) has indeed been attracting strong interest from governments in Asia and the Pacific.
Recognizing this potential, the Regional Road Map for Implementing the 2030 Agenda, endorsed by ESCAP member States in May 2017, highlights the need to undertake research, analysis and consensus-building initiatives to enhance regional knowledge of infrastructure financing, including PPP.
Subsequently, in December 2017 the Committee on Macroeconomic Policy, Poverty Reduction and Financing for Development, requested the ESCAP secretariat to consider developing a network on PPP and infrastructure financing to provide a regular platform where member States can exchange their experiences, disseminate knowledge, engage private sector and build consensus regarding good practices on infrastructure financing.
To this end, ESCAP took the initiative to serve member States’ needs and successfully organized the first meeting of PPP and infrastructure financing network with support from the China Public Private Partnerships Center at the City of Guiyang, Guizhou Province, China on 12 and 13 September 2018.
This was the first regional event, among many more to come, that leverages on the fact that countries in the region are increasingly accumulating experience in engaging private sector for their infrastructure investment.
It gathered the heads of PPP units, infrastructure specialists and capital market experts from 22 countries in the region to enhance knowledge and capacity of PPP units on the effective use of PPP mechanisms as well as other infrastructure financing strategies to support the pursuit of sustainable infrastructure development.
Given that the Asia-Pacific region’s infrastructure investment requirement is immense and public resources are limited, it is important to carefully design financing strategies to fill the existing gaps and meet future infrastructure demand.
As highlighted by the recent Thai example, this can be supported by mobilizing more resources from institutional investors by further deepening capital markets in the regions as well as increasing the availability of investable assets.
Moving forward, member States in Asia and the Pacific would greatly benefit from sharing established good practices with other countries and engaging the private sector in addressing their infrastructure financing challenges, with ESCAP playing an enabling role in such endeavours.
— IPS
[Tientip Subhanij is Chief, Financing for Development, Macroeconomic Policy and Financing for Development Division, ESCAP & Daniel W. Lin is Consultant, Macroeconomic Policy and Financing for Development Division, ESCAP]

Comment

Credit: Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP)
Tientip Subhanij and Daniel W. Lin
 
Infrastructure development is undoubtedly critical for a country’s long-term economic growth and competitiveness as it impacts economic activities by increasing productivity, facilitating trade, and promoting innovation.
Across the Asia Pacific region, however, economic growth as well as broader development goals are hindered by a shortage of roads, mass rapid transit systems, telecommunications, power plants, water and sanitation and other basic infrastructure.
The Asian Development Bank estimates that the average infrastructure requirement for a representative group of 24 developing countries in the region for 2016 to 2020 is 8.2 per cent of the GDP when China is excluded.
However, their current investments average only 3.2 per cent of GDP, leaving the financing gap as large as 5 per cent of GDP. Notably, of the 3.2 per cent of GDP currently invested in infrastructure on average, only 1 per cent of GDP comes from the private sector.
Adding to this challenge, private sector participation in infrastructure investment in emerging markets dropped by 37 percent between 2015 and 2016 globally, reaching the lowest level in 10 years.
Understanding the decline in private investment and how countries can encourage more private sector participation will, therefore, be important in achieving sustainable infrastructure development in the region.
The most recent successful example of engaging private sector financing is from Thailand, where the government has launched a new way to raise private capital through Thailand Future Fund (TFF). Traded on the Stock Exchange of Thailand, the TFF is a 44.7 billion Baht infrastructure mutual fund that aims at raising capital from institutional and private retail investors for the country’s infrastructure development.
The fund invests in value-enhancing state agencies’ infrastructure assets and projects to create long-term distribution growth potential, including expressways, railways, electricity generation and distribution, airports, and deep seaports.
An IPO was made from October 12 to 19 with prices set at 10 Baht each. Since then, major local institutional investors have shown great interest in TFF.
The TTF has the advantage of reducing the government’s burden on public finance by providing fund raising alternative. This is expected to accelerate the Thai government investment in infrastructure projects, which can be injected into TFF in the future, thus, providing institutional and retail investors the opportunity to invest in high performing and stable income infrastructure projects.
The Fund also promotes the development of Thailand’s capital markets by facilitating private sector investment in infrastructure development, which is considered a low risk long-term investment, allowing greater diversification for private investors.
The mobilization of private resources, including through public-private partnerships (PPP) has indeed been attracting strong interest from governments in Asia and the Pacific.
Recognizing this potential, the Regional Road Map for Implementing the 2030 Agenda, endorsed by ESCAP member States in May 2017, highlights the need to undertake research, analysis and consensus-building initiatives to enhance regional knowledge of infrastructure financing, including PPP.
Subsequently, in December 2017 the Committee on Macroeconomic Policy, Poverty Reduction and Financing for Development, requested the ESCAP secretariat to consider developing a network on PPP and infrastructure financing to provide a regular platform where member States can exchange their experiences, disseminate knowledge, engage private sector and build consensus regarding good practices on infrastructure financing.
To this end, ESCAP took the initiative to serve member States’ needs and successfully organized the first meeting of PPP and infrastructure financing network with support from the China Public Private Partnerships Center at the City of Guiyang, Guizhou Province, China on 12 and 13 September 2018.
This was the first regional event, among many more to come, that leverages on the fact that countries in the region are increasingly accumulating experience in engaging private sector for their infrastructure investment.
It gathered the heads of PPP units, infrastructure specialists and capital market experts from 22 countries in the region to enhance knowledge and capacity of PPP units on the effective use of PPP mechanisms as well as other infrastructure financing strategies to support the pursuit of sustainable infrastructure development.
Given that the Asia-Pacific region’s infrastructure investment requirement is immense and public resources are limited, it is important to carefully design financing strategies to fill the existing gaps and meet future infrastructure demand.
As highlighted by the recent Thai example, this can be supported by mobilizing more resources from institutional investors by further deepening capital markets in the regions as well as increasing the availability of investable assets.
Moving forward, member States in Asia and the Pacific would greatly benefit from sharing established good practices with other countries and engaging the private sector in addressing their infrastructure financing challenges, with ESCAP playing an enabling role in such endeavours.
— IPS
[Tientip Subhanij is Chief, Financing for Development, Macroeconomic Policy and Financing for Development Division, ESCAP & Daniel W. Lin is Consultant, Macroeconomic Policy and Financing for Development Division, ESCAP]

Login to post comments


(0)



METROPOLITAN
EDITORIAL
INTERNATIONAL
COMMENTS
BUSINESS
INFOTECH
CULTURE
MISCELLANY
AVIATOUR
LAST WORD
FOUNDING EDITOR: ENAYETULLAH KHAN; EDITOR: SAYED KAMALUDDIN
Contents Copyrighted © by Holiday Publication Limited
Mailing address 30, Tejgaon Industrial Area, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh.
Phone 880-2-8170462, 8170463, 8170464 Fax 880-2-9127927 Email weeklyholiday65@gmail.com
Site Managed By: Southtech Group
Southtech Group does not take any responsibility for any news content of this site