Friday, February 12, 2016 EDITORIAL

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Police’s brutal ferocity can’t be stopped by an unpopular regime

The father of the modern British police, Sir Robert Peel, must be turning in his grave to learn about the brutal ferocity and nefarious unlawful activities of some members of the Bangladesh police. Serving twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Sir Robert was of the view that the police are members of the public who are paid to give full-time attention to duties in the interests of community welfare.
When 148 people were killed in “crossfire” and in the custody of law enforcers, as it happened in 2015, it may not be an overstatement to aver that our People’s Republic under the present Awami League regime is being transformed into a de facto police state where a government exercises its authority arbitrarily through the power of its law enforcing agencies. According to the human rights watchdog Ain O Salish Kendra (ASK) report dated 30 September 2015, claiming 107 lives, the “crossfire” incidents involved police 55 times, Rapid Action Battalion 32 times, police and detectives 11 times and other agencies nine times. [Videextrajudicialkilling.info/2015/09/ain-o-salish-kendra-ask-148-]
A tea shop owner, Babul Matubbar, 45, who sustained burn injuries as a police informant hit his kerosene stove causing the fire, died at Dhaka Medical College Hospital on 5 February, the Dhaka Tribune, the Independent, The Daily Star and the New Age reported. Babul was admitted to the burn unit in a critical condition as 95 per cent of his body was burned following the incident that took place in the capital’s Mirpur area as the victim declined to pay him toll.
Babul’s son Monir Hossain Raju said that before dying, his father had managed to identify Sub-Inspector Shreedham Chandra Halder and a police informant named Delowar Hossain as some of those involved in the attack. Apart from blaming the police for being directly involved in setting fire to Babul’s body, the family also criticised the police’s role in the aftermath of the incident. They claimed that the police had denied severely injured Babul medical treatment and detained him at the police station for around an hour, before finally letting him go.
Babul’s son Raju said that the death of his father was a part of conspiracy as Babul had long been protesting the drug trade of one Parul, who operated her business beside the tea stall owner’s house in Block H of Mirpur 1. Babul had asked Parul – who lives beside his house – to stop her drug trade in the area as the addicts regularly came to his tea stall looking for cannabis and even went inside his house, threatening the safety of his daughters. Raju added that Parul and her associates had threatened his father, saying the police would never come to his aid as the drug dealers had a good arrangement with the law enforcers.
While the National Human Rights Commission Chairman Prof Mizanur Rahman said a man had to die because of “outrageous and illegal” activities of police. “It’s a shame for the whole nation. The outrageous behaviour of police has reached an excessive level”. Although police officials initially denied any involvement of the force members in the death of the tea vendor, five policemen of Shah Ali Police Station —- Dhiman Chandra Howlader, Mominur Rahman Khan and Niaz Uddin Molla, ASI Debendra Nath and constable Jasim Uddin—-were closed. But Home Minister Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal claimed that no police members were involved in the incident.
Just a few weeks ago a police officer beat up and severely injured Bikas Chandra Das, a City Corporation officer; and Golum Rabbi, an officer of Bangladesh Bank, was physically tortured by Masud, a sub-inspector of DMP and his team.
Police is the function of that branch of the administrative machinery of government which is charged with the preservation of public order and tranquility, the promotion of the public health, safety, and morals, and the prevention, detection, and punishment of crimes. [Vide Black’s Law Dictionary and http:/thelawdictionary.org]. One abbreviation on the Internet depicts them as individuals dedicated to “Protection Of Life In Civil Establishment”; regrettably, in our milieu their conduct and dealing with the public are miserably at variance with what is expected of them as per recognised principles and standards.
An unpopular and reviled semi-elected government, like a toddler, fears its own shadow; so is the case with this regime, whose 154 MPs were not elected, and hence not accepted by at least half of the body politic. This is why it resorts to suppress and repress the opposition through the law enforcement agencies giving them unlimited liberty so they can act with impunity, and without accountability.
The remedy lies in complete policy reversal, which means inflexible exemplary punishment, which an unpopular, undemocratic government can never do, unfortunately.


Job for 1.5m abroad: Capacity enhancement needed

It is heartening that the cabinet approved a draft deal to allow Bangladeshi private recruiting agents to send workers to Malaysia following the failure of the government-to-government (G2G) labour recruitment system. Through the new G2G Plus system, a worker can get a job in the Southeast Asian nation, and the migration cost would be a maximum of Tk 37,000, Cabinet Secretary M. Shafiul Alam told reporters.
The government hopes to send around 15 lakh workers to Malaysia in the next three years under a Memorandum of Understanding to be signed with Malaysia in a month. Under the deal, Malaysia will recognise Bangladesh as a “source country” from where workers can be recruited in services, manufacturing, construction and plantation sectors there.
So far so good; but it is a mind-boggling task too as we have to ship 1,370 workers every day for three years—-and it is a gargantuan operation necessarily calling for urgent capacity enhancement.
Notwithstanding practical limitations—-which must be overcome in no time—-we wish all success of the project.

Comment

The father of the modern British police, Sir Robert Peel, must be turning in his grave to learn about the brutal ferocity and nefarious unlawful activities of some members of the Bangladesh police. Serving twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Sir Robert was of the view that the police are members of the public who are paid to give full-time attention to duties in the interests of community welfare.
When 148 people were killed in “crossfire” and in the custody of law enforcers, as it happened in 2015, it may not be an overstatement to aver that our People’s Republic under the present Awami League regime is being transformed into a de facto police state where a government exercises its authority arbitrarily through the power of its law enforcing agencies. According to the human rights watchdog Ain O Salish Kendra (ASK) report dated 30 September 2015, claiming 107 lives, the “crossfire” incidents involved police 55 times, Rapid Action Battalion 32 times, police and detectives 11 times and other agencies nine times. [Videextrajudicialkilling.info/2015/09/ain-o-salish-kendra-ask-148-]
A tea shop owner, Babul Matubbar, 45, who sustained burn injuries as a police informant hit his kerosene stove causing the fire, died at Dhaka Medical College Hospital on 5 February, the Dhaka Tribune, the Independent, The Daily Star and the New Age reported. Babul was admitted to the burn unit in a critical condition as 95 per cent of his body was burned following the incident that took place in the capital’s Mirpur area as the victim declined to pay him toll.
Babul’s son Monir Hossain Raju said that before dying, his father had managed to identify Sub-Inspector Shreedham Chandra Halder and a police informant named Delowar Hossain as some of those involved in the attack. Apart from blaming the police for being directly involved in setting fire to Babul’s body, the family also criticised the police’s role in the aftermath of the incident. They claimed that the police had denied severely injured Babul medical treatment and detained him at the police station for around an hour, before finally letting him go.
Babul’s son Raju said that the death of his father was a part of conspiracy as Babul had long been protesting the drug trade of one Parul, who operated her business beside the tea stall owner’s house in Block H of Mirpur 1. Babul had asked Parul – who lives beside his house – to stop her drug trade in the area as the addicts regularly came to his tea stall looking for cannabis and even went inside his house, threatening the safety of his daughters. Raju added that Parul and her associates had threatened his father, saying the police would never come to his aid as the drug dealers had a good arrangement with the law enforcers.
While the National Human Rights Commission Chairman Prof Mizanur Rahman said a man had to die because of “outrageous and illegal” activities of police. “It’s a shame for the whole nation. The outrageous behaviour of police has reached an excessive level”. Although police officials initially denied any involvement of the force members in the death of the tea vendor, five policemen of Shah Ali Police Station —- Dhiman Chandra Howlader, Mominur Rahman Khan and Niaz Uddin Molla, ASI Debendra Nath and constable Jasim Uddin—-were closed. But Home Minister Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal claimed that no police members were involved in the incident.
Just a few weeks ago a police officer beat up and severely injured Bikas Chandra Das, a City Corporation officer; and Golum Rabbi, an officer of Bangladesh Bank, was physically tortured by Masud, a sub-inspector of DMP and his team.
Police is the function of that branch of the administrative machinery of government which is charged with the preservation of public order and tranquility, the promotion of the public health, safety, and morals, and the prevention, detection, and punishment of crimes. [Vide Black’s Law Dictionary and http:/thelawdictionary.org]. One abbreviation on the Internet depicts them as individuals dedicated to “Protection Of Life In Civil Establishment”; regrettably, in our milieu their conduct and dealing with the public are miserably at variance with what is expected of them as per recognised principles and standards.
An unpopular and reviled semi-elected government, like a toddler, fears its own shadow; so is the case with this regime, whose 154 MPs were not elected, and hence not accepted by at least half of the body politic. This is why it resorts to suppress and repress the opposition through the law enforcement agencies giving them unlimited liberty so they can act with impunity, and without accountability.
The remedy lies in complete policy reversal, which means inflexible exemplary punishment, which an unpopular, undemocratic government can never do, unfortunately.


Job for 1.5m abroad: Capacity enhancement needed

It is heartening that the cabinet approved a draft deal to allow Bangladeshi private recruiting agents to send workers to Malaysia following the failure of the government-to-government (G2G) labour recruitment system. Through the new G2G Plus system, a worker can get a job in the Southeast Asian nation, and the migration cost would be a maximum of Tk 37,000, Cabinet Secretary M. Shafiul Alam told reporters.
The government hopes to send around 15 lakh workers to Malaysia in the next three years under a Memorandum of Understanding to be signed with Malaysia in a month. Under the deal, Malaysia will recognise Bangladesh as a “source country” from where workers can be recruited in services, manufacturing, construction and plantation sectors there.
So far so good; but it is a mind-boggling task too as we have to ship 1,370 workers every day for three years—-and it is a gargantuan operation necessarily calling for urgent capacity enhancement.
Notwithstanding practical limitations—-which must be overcome in no time—-we wish all success of the project.


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Censorship around the world remains high

Makia Freeman
The Freedom Articles

Truth will always be more powerful than lies. And ultimately, a lie can only be censored and can only exist for so long until it is uncovered, exposed, disbelieved and tossed away. Today, we live in an age of uncovering lies and promoting the truth as has never happened before?

Censorship is still a big issue around the world.  Censorship remains at high levels in many countries, despite the fact that we tend to think we live in a world without that much of it (at least in the so-called “enlightened and developed West”). Why are censorship levels so high? There can really only be one reason for it in the end: our so-called “authorities” are afraid of free thought, free speech and the free flow of information. Why? Because it would uncover their secrets, expose their corruption, contradict their fake narratives, dissolve mental structures and undo notions of citizen obedience and civic duty that have been drilled into us since birth, mainly through military- and Rockefeller-influenced education.
If you are still in any doubt about the blatant levels of censorship that exist in our world today, take a look at the following examples. Just days ago, Israel threatened to ban “contrary to reality” headlines by annulling the press credentials of journalists and editors who used them. Turkey has been arresting journalists for years, and things have sharply escalated with the very dictatorial President Erdogan who got busted buying oil from and supplying weapons to ISIS. (Erdogan, by the way, is the very same guy that is still trying to get a Turkish citizen thrown in prison for “insulting the President” because the man compared Erdogan to Gollum from Lord of the Rings.) Some nations take it even further; in Thailand you can actually get imprisoned not only for insulting the King, but also for insulting the king’s dog.
China is so scared of the free flow of information that they have enormous firewalls maintained by their “Ministry of Truth” that gets to decide what people can and cannot see and read online. In Eritria and North Korea, there is no independent journalism; all news media is published by the State. Even in the US, where freedom of the press is enshrined and protected in the 1st Amendment, Congresswomen Dianne Feinstein in 2013 put forth an amendment to narrow the definition of journalism and weed out those who were not, as considered by her, “real reporters”.

Europe to ban Hyperlinks
Europe, it seems, is doing its best not to be left out of the censorship list. Just this week, the highest court in the European Union was hearing arguments to ban hyperlinks. That’s right: in an extraordinary example of governmental overreach, Europe is actually thinking about upholding a law to ban you from linking to other content and sites on the Internet! What’s coming next? Wait for it … a law requiring that we ask the Government the permission to breathe?
It is no understatement to say that linking to other sites is one of the key foundational mechanisms of the entire Internet. It’s a basic building block of the Web. Independent journalist Matt Drudge warned this was coming in October 2015 when he revealed that copyright laws could ban hyperlinking, and that he was told by a Supreme Court justice that “they’ve got the votes now to enforce copyright law”.
Operation Mockingbird was a CIA Project that began around (between) the late 1940s (and) early 1950s, led by Frank Wisner, Cord Meyer and Allen Dulles – the latter being the notorious CIA Director who was the ringleader of the men who killed JFK. Of course, control of the media is a central component in any would-be tyrant’s agenda; it is no surprise that such a scheme has been outlined in key conspiracy documents such as the The Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion, the 10 planks of Communism and also in Orwell’s 1984. By 1975 the control of the press in America by the CIA was so obvious that Senator Frank Church launched an investigation into it.
The Agency’s relationship with [The New York] Times was by far its most valuable among newspapers, according to CIA officials. [It was] general Times policy … to provide assistance to the CIA whenever possible. – The CIA and the Media, by Carl Bernstein.
The Mockingbird has never died. The evidence indicates that censorship in America is worse under Obama than before (see the article Obama is more hostile towards the press than any president in history). In 2015, the US dropped to 49th place in the world for press freedom, behind Malta, Niger, Burkino Faso, El Salvador, Tonga, Chile and Botswana. Meanwhile, the CIA continues to control foreign journalists, such as the ones in Germany, and bribes them to write anti-Russian propaganda, as revealed by Udo Ulfkotte. Udo admitted he was “educated to lie and betray, not to tell the truth to the public … by the CIA.”

Not Just Political Censorship
There is not just a lot of political censorship. Look at the massive amount of censorship that exists in the area of health, medicine and nutrition. Big Pharma is given free rein to say anything it wants, yet makers of natural health products can’t truthfully say what a health product does, what effects it has or what results it has. Often, they can’t show testimonials either, thanks to the free speech gestapo at the FDA. All the health censorship is obviously designed to protect the Rockefeller-Big Pharma monopoly on drugs, and prevent people from knowing the truth about natural alternatives and taking their health into their own hands.
Political correctness is the new censorship – and a cunning one at that. Political correctness is intolerance disguised as tolerance. It is, as the late great comedian George Carlin once said,“awkward, dishonest language” and “fascism pretending to be manners”. Political correctness came from the Rothschild Frankfurt School – part of the broader NWO agenda of cultural Marxism aimed at slowly and softly making you less free.
It operates on the premise that if people’s feelings get hurt by certain words, or if people feel insulted, offended or irritated by certain languages, then they have the right to get the State to outlaw that language. As Carlin says:
(Political correctness) presents itself as fairness, yet attempts to restrict and control people’s language with strict codes and rigid rules … I’m not sure silencing people, or forcing them to alter their speech, is the best method for solving problems that go much deeper than speech.
Political correctness works by using guilt and shaming you into using certain words or phrases, and not using others. It often stands reality on its head, with a verbal sleight of hand. It is a clever way to force people to police themselves, and to control the spectrum of allowable thought and speech. It needs to be exposed and resisted by all freedom-loving people.

Censorship Exists as truth is Powerful
Although this topic of censorship is a sad one, do not be depressed. There is a positive and fundamental truth underlying this issue. Authorities only censor information because THEY can’t handle the truth, not the reverse as it commonly thought. Governments around the world engage in censorship because they are afraid, deadly afraid, of how the free flow of information could undermine their power base. At one level, they don’t trust people to read for themselves, think for themselves and judge the news for themselves. At another level, they fear the exposure of their secrets and corruption.

Comment

Makia Freeman
The Freedom Articles

Truth will always be more powerful than lies. And ultimately, a lie can only be censored and can only exist for so long until it is uncovered, exposed, disbelieved and tossed away. Today, we live in an age of uncovering lies and promoting the truth as has never happened before?

Censorship is still a big issue around the world.  Censorship remains at high levels in many countries, despite the fact that we tend to think we live in a world without that much of it (at least in the so-called “enlightened and developed West”). Why are censorship levels so high? There can really only be one reason for it in the end: our so-called “authorities” are afraid of free thought, free speech and the free flow of information. Why? Because it would uncover their secrets, expose their corruption, contradict their fake narratives, dissolve mental structures and undo notions of citizen obedience and civic duty that have been drilled into us since birth, mainly through military- and Rockefeller-influenced education.
If you are still in any doubt about the blatant levels of censorship that exist in our world today, take a look at the following examples. Just days ago, Israel threatened to ban “contrary to reality” headlines by annulling the press credentials of journalists and editors who used them. Turkey has been arresting journalists for years, and things have sharply escalated with the very dictatorial President Erdogan who got busted buying oil from and supplying weapons to ISIS. (Erdogan, by the way, is the very same guy that is still trying to get a Turkish citizen thrown in prison for “insulting the President” because the man compared Erdogan to Gollum from Lord of the Rings.) Some nations take it even further; in Thailand you can actually get imprisoned not only for insulting the King, but also for insulting the king’s dog.
China is so scared of the free flow of information that they have enormous firewalls maintained by their “Ministry of Truth” that gets to decide what people can and cannot see and read online. In Eritria and North Korea, there is no independent journalism; all news media is published by the State. Even in the US, where freedom of the press is enshrined and protected in the 1st Amendment, Congresswomen Dianne Feinstein in 2013 put forth an amendment to narrow the definition of journalism and weed out those who were not, as considered by her, “real reporters”.

Europe to ban Hyperlinks
Europe, it seems, is doing its best not to be left out of the censorship list. Just this week, the highest court in the European Union was hearing arguments to ban hyperlinks. That’s right: in an extraordinary example of governmental overreach, Europe is actually thinking about upholding a law to ban you from linking to other content and sites on the Internet! What’s coming next? Wait for it … a law requiring that we ask the Government the permission to breathe?
It is no understatement to say that linking to other sites is one of the key foundational mechanisms of the entire Internet. It’s a basic building block of the Web. Independent journalist Matt Drudge warned this was coming in October 2015 when he revealed that copyright laws could ban hyperlinking, and that he was told by a Supreme Court justice that “they’ve got the votes now to enforce copyright law”.
Operation Mockingbird was a CIA Project that began around (between) the late 1940s (and) early 1950s, led by Frank Wisner, Cord Meyer and Allen Dulles – the latter being the notorious CIA Director who was the ringleader of the men who killed JFK. Of course, control of the media is a central component in any would-be tyrant’s agenda; it is no surprise that such a scheme has been outlined in key conspiracy documents such as the The Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion, the 10 planks of Communism and also in Orwell’s 1984. By 1975 the control of the press in America by the CIA was so obvious that Senator Frank Church launched an investigation into it.
The Agency’s relationship with [The New York] Times was by far its most valuable among newspapers, according to CIA officials. [It was] general Times policy … to provide assistance to the CIA whenever possible. – The CIA and the Media, by Carl Bernstein.
The Mockingbird has never died. The evidence indicates that censorship in America is worse under Obama than before (see the article Obama is more hostile towards the press than any president in history). In 2015, the US dropped to 49th place in the world for press freedom, behind Malta, Niger, Burkino Faso, El Salvador, Tonga, Chile and Botswana. Meanwhile, the CIA continues to control foreign journalists, such as the ones in Germany, and bribes them to write anti-Russian propaganda, as revealed by Udo Ulfkotte. Udo admitted he was “educated to lie and betray, not to tell the truth to the public … by the CIA.”

Not Just Political Censorship
There is not just a lot of political censorship. Look at the massive amount of censorship that exists in the area of health, medicine and nutrition. Big Pharma is given free rein to say anything it wants, yet makers of natural health products can’t truthfully say what a health product does, what effects it has or what results it has. Often, they can’t show testimonials either, thanks to the free speech gestapo at the FDA. All the health censorship is obviously designed to protect the Rockefeller-Big Pharma monopoly on drugs, and prevent people from knowing the truth about natural alternatives and taking their health into their own hands.
Political correctness is the new censorship – and a cunning one at that. Political correctness is intolerance disguised as tolerance. It is, as the late great comedian George Carlin once said,“awkward, dishonest language” and “fascism pretending to be manners”. Political correctness came from the Rothschild Frankfurt School – part of the broader NWO agenda of cultural Marxism aimed at slowly and softly making you less free.
It operates on the premise that if people’s feelings get hurt by certain words, or if people feel insulted, offended or irritated by certain languages, then they have the right to get the State to outlaw that language. As Carlin says:
(Political correctness) presents itself as fairness, yet attempts to restrict and control people’s language with strict codes and rigid rules … I’m not sure silencing people, or forcing them to alter their speech, is the best method for solving problems that go much deeper than speech.
Political correctness works by using guilt and shaming you into using certain words or phrases, and not using others. It often stands reality on its head, with a verbal sleight of hand. It is a clever way to force people to police themselves, and to control the spectrum of allowable thought and speech. It needs to be exposed and resisted by all freedom-loving people.

Censorship Exists as truth is Powerful
Although this topic of censorship is a sad one, do not be depressed. There is a positive and fundamental truth underlying this issue. Authorities only censor information because THEY can’t handle the truth, not the reverse as it commonly thought. Governments around the world engage in censorship because they are afraid, deadly afraid, of how the free flow of information could undermine their power base. At one level, they don’t trust people to read for themselves, think for themselves and judge the news for themselves. At another level, they fear the exposure of their secrets and corruption.


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 VIEW POINT

2 CRORE 28 LAKH YOUTHS ARE UNEMPLOYED
Is Bangladesh advancing in the right direction?

A.M.K.Chowdhury

This refers to a news report entitled “Majority believe Bangladesh heading towards right direction: IRI” published in an English language daily on January 27, 2016. It said around 64 per cent of Bangladeshis believe their country is heading towards the right directions currently, pointing to improvements in education, transportation and the economy. International Republican Institute (IRI), a US–based global organization, made the observation as per a recent survey revelation.
Nearly 80 per cent of participants in survey work stated the current economic condition are very good or somewhat good, with 72 per cent indicating that their personal economic condition will improve in the coming year. Around 90 per cent of the participants stated that their family has enough income to afford basic commodities. Some 88 per cent believed that while democracy might have problems, it is still better than any other form of government. (The Daily Observer). This report seems to be confusing.

Falling export prices
However, I am quoting here some news item published in the same paper on the same day. (1) “Falling export prices worry RMG makers”. It said Bangladesh’s apparel prices continue to drop in export market. BGMEA’s (Bangladesh  Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association) president Siddiqur  Rahman said they are facing problems on two sides. One, higher production costs in the local market and secondly, declining prices in export market due to global financial slowdown and fall in oil prices and other raw materials.
(2) : “Traders urged  to settle tax disputes thru ADR”: It said Finance Minister AMA Muhith urged the stakeholders to take advantages of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) to settle pending tax related cases and help the administration recover a big amount of revenue remaining stuck–up for disputes. Taxpayers should get ADR opportunity. If the taxpayers get ADR opportunity revenue collection growth will increase significantly.
(3) : “Export debunk Muhith’s stance on high fuel prices”: It said the Finance Ministry claimed that BPC’s (Bangladesh Petrolum Corporation)  liability is about 26,000 crore  (cumulative loss). The BPC was given a huge amount of subsidy over the years. The BPC had never made  profit in its operations since 2001-02 fiscal, though it bagged a profit   worth Tk. 5,268 crore in 2014 -15 fiscal year.
(4) : “Sonali  Bank rendering  poor services to Pirojpur clients”. It said the state – run  Sonali  Bank is providing  unsatisfactory services to the clients. All the clients of the bank are suffering due to poor transaction and bad governance of the bank.
(5) : “Laxmipur Bhola river route suffers from poor navigability” : It said Laxmipur – Bhola river route connects 21 districts and is the key point for communication between the east and the west coasts of southern part of the country.
The route may stop anytime due to poor navigability and emergence of hidden shoals. Following massive siltation at the entrance of Moju Chowdhuryghat in Laxmipur and Ilishaghat of Bhola, the ferry service through the route is facing serious setback. If the channel is not dredged on an emergency basis the route may become inoperative at any time and transportation and marketing of agricultural products will also face a huge setback.
(6) : “Poor quality textbooks of NCTB hardly attract learners.” It said the textbooks have been printed on very low quality paper which is never eye-soothing. The printing is hazy. Many pictures cannot be identified, many pictures’ ink has faded and dried up. The picture of individuals cannot be identified.
The sewing and binding is very loose. Parents have to spend every month an amount on private coaching. They need to buy other help books as well to make good results as the textbooks cannot cater to the needs of the students.
(7): “IUTA announces to take extra classes”: It said. The Islamic University Teachers Association (IUTA) took the decision to take extra classes to reduce the academic losses due to the IUTA abstention programme at the university. No classes and examinations were held owing to the IUTA work abstention from January 11 to 17 this year.
A news report said that Bangladesh Biman, the national flag carrier incurred a total loss of Tk. 1,435.63 crore in the last five fiscal years from 2009-10 to 2013-14. (ibid, January 25, 2016)

2 crore 28 lakh youths are unemployed
Another news report said some 2 crore 28 lakh youths are unemployed and 31.05 per cent people are poor. Of the total population one thirds are youths. Of them 45 per cent are deprived of education.(The Daily Naya Diganta, dated January 25, 2016)
State minister for Labour and Employment said, “Every year around 18 lakh people need employment anew. It is not possible to provide employment for them. As such many resort to go abroad by illegal way. (The Daily Observer, dated May 24, 2015)

Some people sell their blood for survival
A news report said some people sell their blood for survival. According to physician a healthy man can give blood after 4 months. But there are some people who sell their blood twice in a week. There are many unauthorized blood banks at Shyamoli, Chankharpool, Mohakhali, Mirpur, Badda in the city where these people sell their blood for survival. (The Amader Samoy, dated January 23, 2016)
Another news report said over the last eight years at least 250,000 Bangladeshis and Rohingyas were smuggled to Malaysia through Thailand. The fortune seekers were trapped in the vicious circles of abuses including torture, starvation, captivity, ransoms, forced labour and humiliating deportation. (The Daily Star, dated May 12, 2015).
Question arises whether the above news reports could prove Bangladesh is heading in the right direction towards improvement in education, transportation and the economy? Such news reports are many. Needless to say, the report seems to be confusing.

Comment

A.M.K.Chowdhury

This refers to a news report entitled “Majority believe Bangladesh heading towards right direction: IRI” published in an English language daily on January 27, 2016. It said around 64 per cent of Bangladeshis believe their country is heading towards the right directions currently, pointing to improvements in education, transportation and the economy. International Republican Institute (IRI), a US–based global organization, made the observation as per a recent survey revelation.
Nearly 80 per cent of participants in survey work stated the current economic condition are very good or somewhat good, with 72 per cent indicating that their personal economic condition will improve in the coming year. Around 90 per cent of the participants stated that their family has enough income to afford basic commodities. Some 88 per cent believed that while democracy might have problems, it is still better than any other form of government. (The Daily Observer). This report seems to be confusing.

Falling export prices
However, I am quoting here some news item published in the same paper on the same day. (1) “Falling export prices worry RMG makers”. It said Bangladesh’s apparel prices continue to drop in export market. BGMEA’s (Bangladesh  Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association) president Siddiqur  Rahman said they are facing problems on two sides. One, higher production costs in the local market and secondly, declining prices in export market due to global financial slowdown and fall in oil prices and other raw materials.
(2) : “Traders urged  to settle tax disputes thru ADR”: It said Finance Minister AMA Muhith urged the stakeholders to take advantages of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) to settle pending tax related cases and help the administration recover a big amount of revenue remaining stuck–up for disputes. Taxpayers should get ADR opportunity. If the taxpayers get ADR opportunity revenue collection growth will increase significantly.
(3) : “Export debunk Muhith’s stance on high fuel prices”: It said the Finance Ministry claimed that BPC’s (Bangladesh Petrolum Corporation)  liability is about 26,000 crore  (cumulative loss). The BPC was given a huge amount of subsidy over the years. The BPC had never made  profit in its operations since 2001-02 fiscal, though it bagged a profit   worth Tk. 5,268 crore in 2014 -15 fiscal year.
(4) : “Sonali  Bank rendering  poor services to Pirojpur clients”. It said the state – run  Sonali  Bank is providing  unsatisfactory services to the clients. All the clients of the bank are suffering due to poor transaction and bad governance of the bank.
(5) : “Laxmipur Bhola river route suffers from poor navigability” : It said Laxmipur – Bhola river route connects 21 districts and is the key point for communication between the east and the west coasts of southern part of the country.
The route may stop anytime due to poor navigability and emergence of hidden shoals. Following massive siltation at the entrance of Moju Chowdhuryghat in Laxmipur and Ilishaghat of Bhola, the ferry service through the route is facing serious setback. If the channel is not dredged on an emergency basis the route may become inoperative at any time and transportation and marketing of agricultural products will also face a huge setback.
(6) : “Poor quality textbooks of NCTB hardly attract learners.” It said the textbooks have been printed on very low quality paper which is never eye-soothing. The printing is hazy. Many pictures cannot be identified, many pictures’ ink has faded and dried up. The picture of individuals cannot be identified.
The sewing and binding is very loose. Parents have to spend every month an amount on private coaching. They need to buy other help books as well to make good results as the textbooks cannot cater to the needs of the students.
(7): “IUTA announces to take extra classes”: It said. The Islamic University Teachers Association (IUTA) took the decision to take extra classes to reduce the academic losses due to the IUTA abstention programme at the university. No classes and examinations were held owing to the IUTA work abstention from January 11 to 17 this year.
A news report said that Bangladesh Biman, the national flag carrier incurred a total loss of Tk. 1,435.63 crore in the last five fiscal years from 2009-10 to 2013-14. (ibid, January 25, 2016)

2 crore 28 lakh youths are unemployed
Another news report said some 2 crore 28 lakh youths are unemployed and 31.05 per cent people are poor. Of the total population one thirds are youths. Of them 45 per cent are deprived of education.(The Daily Naya Diganta, dated January 25, 2016)
State minister for Labour and Employment said, “Every year around 18 lakh people need employment anew. It is not possible to provide employment for them. As such many resort to go abroad by illegal way. (The Daily Observer, dated May 24, 2015)

Some people sell their blood for survival
A news report said some people sell their blood for survival. According to physician a healthy man can give blood after 4 months. But there are some people who sell their blood twice in a week. There are many unauthorized blood banks at Shyamoli, Chankharpool, Mohakhali, Mirpur, Badda in the city where these people sell their blood for survival. (The Amader Samoy, dated January 23, 2016)
Another news report said over the last eight years at least 250,000 Bangladeshis and Rohingyas were smuggled to Malaysia through Thailand. The fortune seekers were trapped in the vicious circles of abuses including torture, starvation, captivity, ransoms, forced labour and humiliating deportation. (The Daily Star, dated May 12, 2015).
Question arises whether the above news reports could prove Bangladesh is heading in the right direction towards improvement in education, transportation and the economy? Such news reports are many. Needless to say, the report seems to be confusing.


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