Friday, May 25, 2018 METROPOLITAN

Skip Navigation Links
 
link
 
link
SUPPLEMENT

Visitor Login










Stop extrajudicial killings in the name of fighting drugs

Special Correspondent
 
Different political parties and rights organisations on Wednesday urged the government to stop extrajudicial killings in the name of fighting drugs in Bangladesh.
They made the demand against the backdrop of anti-drug drives across the country since early May as law enforcing agencies have claimed deaths of 42 ‘drug peddlers’ in ‘gunfights’ since May 15.
BNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi, at a news briefing in the party’s central office in Dhaka, said over 40 people were killed in ‘gunfights’ in nine days till Wednesday and the law enforcers had branded them ‘drug peddlers’.
Rizvi questioned the purpose of extrajudicial killings of suspected drug dealers when ‘real big drug dealers’ could remain untouched. The BNP leader alleged that they were visiting the residences of influential ministers.
‘Many people fear that during the spree of extrajudicial killings anti-government people would be eliminated,’ he said wondering whether the government was taking the country towards a blood-stained general election.
The Democratic Left Alliance, a platform of eight left political parties, in a joint statement on Wednesday said that the killings of people without trial in the name of containing drugs contradicted the rule of law, democratic norms and the constitution. 
The joint statement issued by Socialist Party of Bangladesh (Marxist) central working committee member Shubhrangshu Chakrabarty, Revolutionary Workers’ Party general secretary Saiful Huq, United Communist League general secretary Mosharrof Hossain Nannu, Democratic Revolutionary Party general secretary Moshrefa Mishu, Ganasanghati Andolan chief coordinator Zonayed Saki and Bangladesher Samajtantrik Andolan convener Hamidul Huq alleged that the law-enforcing agencies were taking laws in their hands.
‘If the government really wanted to contain drug trades, they would have arrested the godfathers of drugs,’ said the statement.
The leaders said that the drives were actually nothing but ‘shows’ and reflect a fascist rule.
A statement issued by the Committee for the Protection of Fundamental Rights on Wednesday said that the number of deaths during the anti-drug drives was increasing alarmingly in the past few days.
‘Crimes are committed in every country and after the crimes, cases are lodged, and the accused are presented before the courts for trial. Later, evidences and proofs are presented before the court. If the court is satisfied, it punishes the accused,’ the statement signed by eminent jurist Shahdeen Malik said.
In the drives, it said, these core spirits of the rule of law and democracy were ignored.
‘Law-enforcing agencies are deciding about the accused, judging whether they are guilty and delivering the punishment, that is, the death sentence is being executed through the so called gunfights,’ the statement said.
The statement feared that if such killings continued, the country would see no rule of law and democracy.
Rights organisation Naripokkho in a statement issued by its movement secretary Tamanna Khan said that the killings in anti-drug drives were not acceptable at all.
The statement said that they welcomed the drives but were concerned about the killings one after another.
They urged the government to ensure justice by establishing the rule of law and contain drugs by creating awareness and proper implementation of law.
 
Ershad opposes ‘gunfights’
Mean while, ruling alliance partner Jatiya Party chairman HM Ershad on Wednesday opposed extrajudicial killings in the name of ‘gunfights’ across the country. 
Addressing a pre-iftar discussion at the Institution of Diploma Engineers in Dhaka organised by the central committee of the party, the former dictator said that a number of people were being killed every day in ‘gunfights’ in a countrywide anti-drug special drive launched by the government.
‘The extrajudicial killings will not be accepted at home and abroad as everyone has a right to get justice,’ Ershad said at a time when at least 42 suspected drug peddlers were killed in ‘gunfights’ in nine days.
Referring to his speech in Jatiya Sangsad, he said that the great drug peddlers were with them in the parliament. 
He said that the government should enact a law giving life sentence for drug peddlers. He proposed that the government should bring a bill in the next session of the parliament for enacting the law by which the extrajudicial killings could be avoided.

Comment

Special Correspondent
 
Different political parties and rights organisations on Wednesday urged the government to stop extrajudicial killings in the name of fighting drugs in Bangladesh.
They made the demand against the backdrop of anti-drug drives across the country since early May as law enforcing agencies have claimed deaths of 42 ‘drug peddlers’ in ‘gunfights’ since May 15.
BNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi, at a news briefing in the party’s central office in Dhaka, said over 40 people were killed in ‘gunfights’ in nine days till Wednesday and the law enforcers had branded them ‘drug peddlers’.
Rizvi questioned the purpose of extrajudicial killings of suspected drug dealers when ‘real big drug dealers’ could remain untouched. The BNP leader alleged that they were visiting the residences of influential ministers.
‘Many people fear that during the spree of extrajudicial killings anti-government people would be eliminated,’ he said wondering whether the government was taking the country towards a blood-stained general election.
The Democratic Left Alliance, a platform of eight left political parties, in a joint statement on Wednesday said that the killings of people without trial in the name of containing drugs contradicted the rule of law, democratic norms and the constitution. 
The joint statement issued by Socialist Party of Bangladesh (Marxist) central working committee member Shubhrangshu Chakrabarty, Revolutionary Workers’ Party general secretary Saiful Huq, United Communist League general secretary Mosharrof Hossain Nannu, Democratic Revolutionary Party general secretary Moshrefa Mishu, Ganasanghati Andolan chief coordinator Zonayed Saki and Bangladesher Samajtantrik Andolan convener Hamidul Huq alleged that the law-enforcing agencies were taking laws in their hands.
‘If the government really wanted to contain drug trades, they would have arrested the godfathers of drugs,’ said the statement.
The leaders said that the drives were actually nothing but ‘shows’ and reflect a fascist rule.
A statement issued by the Committee for the Protection of Fundamental Rights on Wednesday said that the number of deaths during the anti-drug drives was increasing alarmingly in the past few days.
‘Crimes are committed in every country and after the crimes, cases are lodged, and the accused are presented before the courts for trial. Later, evidences and proofs are presented before the court. If the court is satisfied, it punishes the accused,’ the statement signed by eminent jurist Shahdeen Malik said.
In the drives, it said, these core spirits of the rule of law and democracy were ignored.
‘Law-enforcing agencies are deciding about the accused, judging whether they are guilty and delivering the punishment, that is, the death sentence is being executed through the so called gunfights,’ the statement said.
The statement feared that if such killings continued, the country would see no rule of law and democracy.
Rights organisation Naripokkho in a statement issued by its movement secretary Tamanna Khan said that the killings in anti-drug drives were not acceptable at all.
The statement said that they welcomed the drives but were concerned about the killings one after another.
They urged the government to ensure justice by establishing the rule of law and contain drugs by creating awareness and proper implementation of law.
 
Ershad opposes ‘gunfights’
Mean while, ruling alliance partner Jatiya Party chairman HM Ershad on Wednesday opposed extrajudicial killings in the name of ‘gunfights’ across the country. 
Addressing a pre-iftar discussion at the Institution of Diploma Engineers in Dhaka organised by the central committee of the party, the former dictator said that a number of people were being killed every day in ‘gunfights’ in a countrywide anti-drug special drive launched by the government.
‘The extrajudicial killings will not be accepted at home and abroad as everyone has a right to get justice,’ Ershad said at a time when at least 42 suspected drug peddlers were killed in ‘gunfights’ in nine days.
Referring to his speech in Jatiya Sangsad, he said that the great drug peddlers were with them in the parliament. 
He said that the government should enact a law giving life sentence for drug peddlers. He proposed that the government should bring a bill in the next session of the parliament for enacting the law by which the extrajudicial killings could be avoided.

Login to post comments


(0)



Rohingyas to be relocated in Bhasanchar

Special Correspondent
 
Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina on Wednesday said 100,000 of the displaced Rohingya people, now living in Bangladesh, would be shifted to Bhasanchar Island in Noakhali soon for giving them shelter there until their repatriation.
She said this when UN Under Secretary General and Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Dr Natalia Kanem met her at the Prime Minister’s Office in Dhaka.
Hasina said some 100,000 Rohingyas would be shifted to Bhashanchar soon as 6,000 people were working there to arrange their accommodations.
She said Bangladesh was a disaster-prone country and the upcoming monsoon may cause untold sufferings to the Rohingyas. “So, measures are being taken for their temporary shelter in Bhashanchar. They’ll stay there until their repatriation.”
On an earlier occasion, Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina told the media that “from a natural point of view it is very nice” and said although the initial plan was to put 100,000 people there, it had room for as many as 1 million.
The prime minister said Bangladesh had given shelter to the Rohingya people who fled persecutions in Myanmar’s Rakhine state on humanitarian grounds and the locals in Cox’s Bazar were also cooperating with the Rohingyas.
She informed Kanem that 60 babies were born in Rohingya camps on average a day.
Kanem highly praised the prime minister for giving shelter and support to the Rohingyas, and her government’s successes in women empowerment in Bangladesh.
 
Earlier commitment
Earlier in February, Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina said that putting Rohingya on the low-lying island would be a “temporary arrangement” to ease congestion at the camps in Cox’s Bazar, refuge for nearly 700,000 who have crossed from the north of Myanmar’s Rakhine state since the end of August last year.
Prime Minister’s Advisor H T Imam told the media that “It’s not a concentration camp, but there may be some restrictions. We are not giving them a Bangladeshi passport or ID card. Once there, they would only be able to leave the island if they wanted to go back to Myanmar or were selected for asylum by a third country.
H.T. Imam said the island would have a police encampment with 40-50 armed personnel.
 
Frenetic construction
However, Humanitarian agencies criticized the plan to bring Rohingya to the island when it was first proposed in 2015. Aid workers also said they remain seriously concerned that the silt island is vulnerable to frequent cyclones and cannot sustain livelihoods for thousands of people.
Bhasan Char - whose name means “floating island” - there were no roads, buildings or people.
The Island, which emerged from the silt only about 20 years ago, is about 30 km (21 miles) from the mainland. Flat and shape-shifting, it regularly floods during June-September. Pirates roam the nearby waters to kidnap fishermen for ransom, residents of nearby islands say.
The plans show metal-roofed, brick buildings raised on pylons and fitted with solar panels. There will be 1,440 blocks, each housing 16 families.
Chinese construction company Sinohydro - better known for building China’s Three Gorges Dam - has been engaged to work on a 13-km (8-mile) flood-defence embankment for the $280-million project.
Omar Waraich, Deputy South Asia Director for rights group Amnesty International, said there was “no one in the humanitarian community we spoke to who thought this was a good idea”.
“This is a silt island that only emerged into view recently,” he said.
Residents of nearby Sandwip island, which is larger and less remote, say monsoon storms regularly kill people, destroy homes and cut contact with the mainland.
The government was building cyclone shelters on the island and officials say that there were salt-tolerant paddies and people living there could fish or graze cows and buffalo.
However, Rohingyas also reject the idea of moving to an island even further from Myanmar, which many of them have called home for generations.

Comment

Special Correspondent
 
Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina on Wednesday said 100,000 of the displaced Rohingya people, now living in Bangladesh, would be shifted to Bhasanchar Island in Noakhali soon for giving them shelter there until their repatriation.
She said this when UN Under Secretary General and Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Dr Natalia Kanem met her at the Prime Minister’s Office in Dhaka.
Hasina said some 100,000 Rohingyas would be shifted to Bhashanchar soon as 6,000 people were working there to arrange their accommodations.
She said Bangladesh was a disaster-prone country and the upcoming monsoon may cause untold sufferings to the Rohingyas. “So, measures are being taken for their temporary shelter in Bhashanchar. They’ll stay there until their repatriation.”
On an earlier occasion, Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina told the media that “from a natural point of view it is very nice” and said although the initial plan was to put 100,000 people there, it had room for as many as 1 million.
The prime minister said Bangladesh had given shelter to the Rohingya people who fled persecutions in Myanmar’s Rakhine state on humanitarian grounds and the locals in Cox’s Bazar were also cooperating with the Rohingyas.
She informed Kanem that 60 babies were born in Rohingya camps on average a day.
Kanem highly praised the prime minister for giving shelter and support to the Rohingyas, and her government’s successes in women empowerment in Bangladesh.
 
Earlier commitment
Earlier in February, Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina said that putting Rohingya on the low-lying island would be a “temporary arrangement” to ease congestion at the camps in Cox’s Bazar, refuge for nearly 700,000 who have crossed from the north of Myanmar’s Rakhine state since the end of August last year.
Prime Minister’s Advisor H T Imam told the media that “It’s not a concentration camp, but there may be some restrictions. We are not giving them a Bangladeshi passport or ID card. Once there, they would only be able to leave the island if they wanted to go back to Myanmar or were selected for asylum by a third country.
H.T. Imam said the island would have a police encampment with 40-50 armed personnel.
 
Frenetic construction
However, Humanitarian agencies criticized the plan to bring Rohingya to the island when it was first proposed in 2015. Aid workers also said they remain seriously concerned that the silt island is vulnerable to frequent cyclones and cannot sustain livelihoods for thousands of people.
Bhasan Char - whose name means “floating island” - there were no roads, buildings or people.
The Island, which emerged from the silt only about 20 years ago, is about 30 km (21 miles) from the mainland. Flat and shape-shifting, it regularly floods during June-September. Pirates roam the nearby waters to kidnap fishermen for ransom, residents of nearby islands say.
The plans show metal-roofed, brick buildings raised on pylons and fitted with solar panels. There will be 1,440 blocks, each housing 16 families.
Chinese construction company Sinohydro - better known for building China’s Three Gorges Dam - has been engaged to work on a 13-km (8-mile) flood-defence embankment for the $280-million project.
Omar Waraich, Deputy South Asia Director for rights group Amnesty International, said there was “no one in the humanitarian community we spoke to who thought this was a good idea”.
“This is a silt island that only emerged into view recently,” he said.
Residents of nearby Sandwip island, which is larger and less remote, say monsoon storms regularly kill people, destroy homes and cut contact with the mainland.
The government was building cyclone shelters on the island and officials say that there were salt-tolerant paddies and people living there could fish or graze cows and buffalo.
However, Rohingyas also reject the idea of moving to an island even further from Myanmar, which many of them have called home for generations.

Login to post comments


(0)



Catastrophe feared for Rohingyas in monsoon

Special Correspondent
 
Tens of thousands of Rohingya refugees in camps in Bangladesh’s coastal district of Cox’s bazaar are at imminent risk of landslides, Human Rights Watch said last week in releasing a new online video. 
Bangladesh authorities, with the assistance of the United Nations and other humanitarian agencies, should urgently relocate refugees to safer ground, the international organization suggested. 
Thousands of hand-built tarpaulin and bamboo shelters are threatened by strong winds and cyclones during the coming monsoon season. Rohingya refugees living on the steep, deforested slopes of sand and clay in the Kutupalong-Balukhali camps face added dangers of landslides. Altogether over 700,000 recent Rohingya refugees from Myanmar are living in camps in Bangladesh.
“The situation in the Rohingya camps is a disaster waiting to happen,” said Bill Frelick, refugee rights director at Human Rights Watch. “Already, after a few bouts of rain with winds , some shelters were blown away and the narrow paths are slippery and dangerous.”
A landslide on May 18, 2018, in a densely packed area in Camp 11, washed away a hut that housed three families, numbering a total of 17 people, who were unharmed. Nobi Hassan, the head of one of those families, told Human Rights Watch that he asked the appointed local leader to relocate them to a safer place, but was told they had to stay in the same block. He said there is no space left in that block and all the other huts were also precariously situated.
“Many Rohingya want to return to Myanmar if their rights and identity are respected, but sadly that won’t happen anytime soon,” Frelick said. “In the meantime, people like Nobi Hassan and his family desperately need a safe place to live.”

Comment

Special Correspondent
 
Tens of thousands of Rohingya refugees in camps in Bangladesh’s coastal district of Cox’s bazaar are at imminent risk of landslides, Human Rights Watch said last week in releasing a new online video. 
Bangladesh authorities, with the assistance of the United Nations and other humanitarian agencies, should urgently relocate refugees to safer ground, the international organization suggested. 
Thousands of hand-built tarpaulin and bamboo shelters are threatened by strong winds and cyclones during the coming monsoon season. Rohingya refugees living on the steep, deforested slopes of sand and clay in the Kutupalong-Balukhali camps face added dangers of landslides. Altogether over 700,000 recent Rohingya refugees from Myanmar are living in camps in Bangladesh.
“The situation in the Rohingya camps is a disaster waiting to happen,” said Bill Frelick, refugee rights director at Human Rights Watch. “Already, after a few bouts of rain with winds , some shelters were blown away and the narrow paths are slippery and dangerous.”
A landslide on May 18, 2018, in a densely packed area in Camp 11, washed away a hut that housed three families, numbering a total of 17 people, who were unharmed. Nobi Hassan, the head of one of those families, told Human Rights Watch that he asked the appointed local leader to relocate them to a safer place, but was told they had to stay in the same block. He said there is no space left in that block and all the other huts were also precariously situated.
“Many Rohingya want to return to Myanmar if their rights and identity are respected, but sadly that won’t happen anytime soon,” Frelick said. “In the meantime, people like Nobi Hassan and his family desperately need a safe place to live.”

Login to post comments


(0)



Journalists urged to highlight climate related disasters

Sazedul Islam
 
Dhaka: Terming the country’s northwestern region as one of the most poverty-stricken and disaster prone areas in Bangladesh, speakers at a media dialogue called upon journalists to highlight the sufferings, faced by people there due to negative effects of climate change. 
Many people in the region are falling into poverty due to being victims of climate change related disasters such as flood, erosion, drought, heat stress, draw down of underground water. The climatic disasters had severe negative impacts on agriculture, health, economy and livelihoods of the common people, they said. 
They made the remarks at the media dialogue on ‘Patterns and Effects of Climate Change in the Northwestern Region of Bangladesh’ while presenting a study report at VIP Lounge of National Press Club recently.
Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies (BCAS) and NETZ Bangladesh, a German-based NGO, jointly organized the programme.
Though different projects have been taken up at both public and private levels for reducing disaster risks and improving the economic condition of people in the region in the past, it failed to bring the desired results. We assume that climate induced problems may hamper our development, they observed.
To overcome the crisis, they suggested the following measures: adopting National Adaptation Plan taking into account of the risks and vulnerability of the region as well as adaptation needs of the poor people, establishing grain bank at community level, and developing buffer stock of food in the flood-prone areas.
The recommendations also include capacity building of local people, dissemination of flood and drought-tolerant crops, introducing well-targeted food and cash programme, raising awareness on Disaster Risk Reduction and climate change, and giving adequate allocation from Climate Change Trust Fund for the region.
The speakers hoped that frequent media coverage on the matters would help raise awareness among people and also draw the attention of policymakers to the issue. 
Dr. Atiq Rahman, executive director of BCAS, Shahidul Islam, deputy director of NETZ Bangladesh, Mizanur Rahman Bijoy, policy and advocacy specialist of Network on Climate Change, Bangladesh (NCC,B) Trust, among others, spoke on the occasion.
Dr. Dwijen Mallick, a fellow of BCAS, presented the keynote paper.

Comment

Sazedul Islam
 
Dhaka: Terming the country’s northwestern region as one of the most poverty-stricken and disaster prone areas in Bangladesh, speakers at a media dialogue called upon journalists to highlight the sufferings, faced by people there due to negative effects of climate change. 
Many people in the region are falling into poverty due to being victims of climate change related disasters such as flood, erosion, drought, heat stress, draw down of underground water. The climatic disasters had severe negative impacts on agriculture, health, economy and livelihoods of the common people, they said. 
They made the remarks at the media dialogue on ‘Patterns and Effects of Climate Change in the Northwestern Region of Bangladesh’ while presenting a study report at VIP Lounge of National Press Club recently.
Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies (BCAS) and NETZ Bangladesh, a German-based NGO, jointly organized the programme.
Though different projects have been taken up at both public and private levels for reducing disaster risks and improving the economic condition of people in the region in the past, it failed to bring the desired results. We assume that climate induced problems may hamper our development, they observed.
To overcome the crisis, they suggested the following measures: adopting National Adaptation Plan taking into account of the risks and vulnerability of the region as well as adaptation needs of the poor people, establishing grain bank at community level, and developing buffer stock of food in the flood-prone areas.
The recommendations also include capacity building of local people, dissemination of flood and drought-tolerant crops, introducing well-targeted food and cash programme, raising awareness on Disaster Risk Reduction and climate change, and giving adequate allocation from Climate Change Trust Fund for the region.
The speakers hoped that frequent media coverage on the matters would help raise awareness among people and also draw the attention of policymakers to the issue. 
Dr. Atiq Rahman, executive director of BCAS, Shahidul Islam, deputy director of NETZ Bangladesh, Mizanur Rahman Bijoy, policy and advocacy specialist of Network on Climate Change, Bangladesh (NCC,B) Trust, among others, spoke on the occasion.
Dr. Dwijen Mallick, a fellow of BCAS, presented the keynote paper.

Login to post comments


(0)



METROPOLITAN
EDITORIAL
COMMENTS
INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS
INFOTECH
CULTURE
MISCELLANY
AVIATOUR
LAST WORD
FOUNDING EDITOR: ENAYETULLAH KHAN; EDITOR: SAYED KAMALUDDIN
Contents Copyrighted © by Holiday Publication Limited
Mailing address 30, Tejgaon Industrial Area, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh.
Phone 880-2-8170462, 8170463, 8170464 Fax 880-2-9127927 Email holiday@bangla.net
Site Managed By: Southtech Limited
Southtech Limited does not take any responsibility for any news content of this site