Autonomous vehicles will alter urban tourism

ACADEMICS from the University of Oxford and the University of Surrey have examined in the first study of its kind how Autonomous Vehicles (AVs) may have a substantial impact on the future of urban tourism.
The study calls for future work that provides context-specific analyses that may reveal alternative ways of thinking about AVs for urban tourism. Its release coincides this week with the World Travel Market and European Tourism Day on 7 November and acts as a timely reminder of the rising importance and significance of AVs in tourism to industry and policy makers.
With the potential of fewer cars on the streets, parking loads will be reduced which will create the possibility of new public urban spaces. Taxi fares may be reduced as rideshare networks increase.
The new study by Professor Scott Cohen of the University of Surrey and Dr Debbie Hopkins of the University of Oxford says theAVs will be spotted on roads as soon 2025 and could lead to far-reaching impacts on urban tourism.
Autonomous vehicles (AVs) may be spotted on roads as soon 2025 and the research focuses on the pros and cons of the technology with regards to the transformation of urban space, the rise of autonomous taxis, and changes to city sightseeing and hospitality in the urban night.
Electronic stability control
Level 1 function-specific automation is reached when a single control function is automated, such as when electronic stability control systems help drivers maintain vehicle control, without completely replacing the need for driver vigilance.
Level 2 combined function automation occurs when two primary control functions are designed to work together to relieve a driver, although the driver must be available at a moment’s notice to take control if necessary; one example of Level 2 automation is when adaptive cruise control is used in conjunction with lane centering systems.
The next step is Level 3 limited self-driving automation, where the driver cedes control of safety-critical functions under certain traffic or environmental conditions and can be given a comfortable transition period when the driver must retake control.
Finally, Level 4 full self-driving automation is achieved when a driver cedes full vehicle control and is not expected to be available for anything more than setting a destination and adjusting navigational controls, if necessary.
Impact of these vehicles
The disruption that autonomous vehicles will wreak in the segment of automobiles will unleash all of these radical transformations and set in motion a chain reaction impacting everything from individual decision making, to collective preferences, to the growth chart of the economy and the role of industry players in it.

With the spiraling popularity of autonomous vehicles in the future, a lot of would become obsolete as people would accustom themselves to new innovative ways in a new paradigm that will redefine a lot of things.
AVs are also the subject of many concerns. More time spent in cars on longer journeys could facilitate greater urban sprawl and increase car dependency. They may also reduce demand for train travel, coach tours, public transport and driven taxis—all resulting in future job losses. The potential for terrorism facilitated by AVs also raises genuine security fears.
Multiple car models by 2020
Many incumbent vehicles manufactures are hoping to have commercially-viable automated driving capabilities in multiple car models by 2020 as well as new entrants to the motor industry like Google, Apple and Uber are also aiming to develop a fully automated vehicle along a similar timeline.
Uber CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi has restated Uber’s plan to have flying cars zipping around US cities within ten years and robot taxis on streets within 10-15 years. His brave attempt can encourage many other business magnates to think about investing in this technology.
The conceptual paper entitled Autonomous vehicles and the future of urban tourism imagines the impact of AVs in future urban tourism and focuses on the details of these impacts with regards to the transformation of urban space, the rise of autonomous taxis, and changes to city sightseeing and hospitality in the urban night.
Reduced traffic congestion and emissions
Potential benefits include reduced traffic congestion and emissions, improved foreign car hire processes, reduced parking requirements and cheaper taxi fares. AVs may impact other industries in radical ways too, such as Amsterdam’s Red Light District, which could become operated out of moving AVs, and restaurants and hotels may encounter new competition in the form of AV dining cars and passengers sleeping in their moving vehicles.
AVs are also the subject of many concerns. More time spent in cars on longer journeys could facilitate greater urban sprawl and increase car dependency. AVs may reduce demand for train travel, coach tours, public transport and driven taxis—all resulting in future job losses. The potential for terrorism facilitated by AVs also raises genuine security fears.
Traffic Jams, parking spaces, car insurance
Across the world, nearly 1.3 million people die in car crashes every year –which makes it around 4,000 deaths per day. Most of these fatalities occur solely due to negligence, rash driving, being under the influence of inebriating substances, or other avoidable human errors. Consequently, car insurance is a multi-billion dollar business. But when there won’t be a human driver behind the steering and the car would navigate automatically with the help of LiDAR and AI algorithms, the probability of car crashes would be negligible. And this would result in fewer people opting for insurances and eventually lead to insurance companies bearing heavy losses.
Cloud-connected cars with computerized controlling won’t just drive themselves; they will also effectively communicate with other cars, traffic signals or emergency services. When the number of cars on the road increases, these systems could speed up city traffic and reduce jams by rerouting flows away from accidents or repricing toll routes. They might also curb the daily rush hour by allowing employers and local governments to encourage more flexible working hours.
—Internet

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